Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 10/05/2017

INLAND REPORT

Fall TROUT Stocking- Trout stocking has started up once again. We are currently focusing on lakes and ponds as stream and river flows are once again at or near historic low levels and not suitable for releasing fish. Stay up to date with our daily stocking post on Facebook, our interactive trout stocking map, and our stocking report.

LARGEMOUTH BASS fishing is reported as good. Places where the largemouth are eager to bite include East Twin Lake, Gardner Lake, Pickerel Lake, Beseck Lake, Amos Lake, Beach Pond, Highland Lake, Seymour Reservoir #4, Crystal Lake, Mudge Pond, West Side Pond, Tyler Lake, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Dog Pond, Hatch Pond, Park Pond, Lake Wononskopomuc, Lake Saltonstall, Bishop Swamp, Winchester Lake, Congamond Lakes, Quinebaug Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Burr Pond, Griggs Pond, Anderson Pond, Billings Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Aspinook Pond, Babcock Pond, Pachaug Pond, Lake Hayward, Quonnipaug Lake, Rogers Lake and Stillwater Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Amos Lake (good, nice bags with fish averaging 2.6 lbs apiece, and a 4.24 lb lunker), Aspinook Pond (fair, 3.19 lb lunker), Gardner Lake (fair, 4.50 lb lunker), Mashapaug Lake (fair, 2.13 lb lunker), Moodus Reservoir (fair to good, little size, fish averaged only a bit over 1 lb apiece with 2.32 lb lunker), Quaddick Lake (fair to good, 4.2 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair, 3.39 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (slow to fair, 4.66 lb lunker) and the Connecticut River (fair, 4.19 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS – Catches reported from Candlewood Lake, Housatonic River (upper), Naugatuck River, Lake Zoar and Lake Lillinonah. Housatonic River smallmouth fishing has been good.

Tournament angler reports are from Aspinook Pond (slow to fair), Candlewood Lake (good, 4.56 lb, 4.11 lb, 4.01 lb, 3.98 lb lunkers), Lake Lillinonah (fair to good, 4.02 lb lunker), Mashapaug Lake (a few), and the Connecticut River (slow).

CARP are hitting in the Housatonic River Impoundments, West Thompson Reservoir, Batterson Park Pond, CT River/Mattabesset River, and the Quinebaug River (West Thompson and Aspinook Pond).

NORTHERN PIKE – Some medium to large pike coming out of Lake Lillinonah and the CT River.

WALLEYE – Some real decent fish reported from the Saugatuck Reservoir. Other waters for walleye include Mount Tom Pond, Squantz Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, Gardner Lake, and Mashapaug Lake.

CATFISH – Fishing remains solid with 2-6 pounders coming out of many of our Catfish Management Lakes and several Community Fishing Waters. Try cut fish (mackerel) or live shiners to entice a cat to bite.

PANFISH – are still a great bet. Calico Bass should be picking up a bit. Perfect for family fun along the shoreline
of a small pond.

FALLFISH (DACE) – lots of reports of action (while the trout stocking is on hold) from the Willimantic River, Shetucket River, Natchaug River, Lower Farmington River (Avon-Windsor), Housatonic River (Cornwall to Kent), Scantic River (Somers to East Windsor), and Yantic River. The current state record Fallfish (2.25 pounds) was taken in 2012 by Chad Tessman.

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS – Conditions for trout fishing are poor with flows rapidly decreasing by the day. We have quickly fallen back into very dry and very low flow situation statewide (dark red and brown colors from gauges around the state). This week the Willimantic River TMA was stocked. Earlier this fall we stocked the Farmington River TMA (Collinsville to Unionville), Housatonic River TMA (Cornwall), Salmon River, Salmon River TMA, and the Moosup River TMA. For the latest information on what has been stocked, follow our daily posts on Facebook Page or Twitter Page, view our current stocking report, or check out the interactive trout stocking map.

Farmington River – Fishing remains very good. The West Branch flows are clear and lower than typical for late September (currently 66 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River at 11 CFS). Morning water temperatures ranging from the mid to upper 50’s °F through New Hartford (and into the upper 60’s °F farther downstream). CT DEEP continues to augment the flow in the river during the continued warmer than normal air temperatures to keep the water from getting too warm.

Hatches/patterns shifting to the fall patterns. Some go-to flies include Isonychia (#12-14, parachute style), Blue Wing Olives (#18, 22-24, mid-late afternoon), Caddis (tan #16-18, all day; brown #16-18), Midges (#20-32, morning), and Rusty Spinner (#14-20, mornings). White Wooly Buggers, Muddlers, Micky Finn, or Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10) are standard streamers. Bottom bouncing nymphs with Caddis pupa (#14-16), Serendipity (#14- 16), Prince (#6-18) and Hare’s ear (#8-20) works well.

Housatonic River – Fishing has been very good. The flows have dropped even lower, but you can still have a great day on the river (currently 156 CFS at Falls Village and 243 CFS at Gaylordsville). Morning water temperatures are in the upper 60’s °F. With the weather forecast to be more fall-like, this weekend is perfect to take some “me” time and fish the famed “Housy”.

Hatches/patterns include a good diversity of insects. Patterns to try include Blue Wing Olive (#18-24, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 evening), Midges (#20-24) and caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening). Also try terrestrial patterns such as Black and Cinnamon Ants (#16-18, midday, when breezy) and large streamers, or nymphing the pockets, deeper riffles and pool heads.

The area between the Route 4 Bridge and Route 341 Bridge is still offering great fishing with smallmouth and fallfish eagerly hitting a variety of poppers, dry flies, nymphs, and streamers.

Streamer fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies is usually productive. Streamer patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers (#2-12), Muddlers, Lion Buggers, and Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10). Light Cahill (#12- 14, evening), Isonychia (#10-12), Sulfur (#16-18) and Black caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening).

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS – Improving quickly with re-start of fall stocking. Here is this week’s list: EAST: Valley Falls Park Pond Trout Park, Wangumbaug (Coventry) Lake, Long Pond, Amos Lake, Beach Pond, Chatfield Hollow Trout Park (Schreeder Pond only), Quonnipaug Lake, Cedar Lake, Day Pond Trout Park, Black Pond (Middlefield/Meriden), Wauregan Reservoir, Mohegan Park Pond Trout Park, Gardner Lake, Rogers Lake, Crystal Lake (Ellington), Mashapaug Lake, and Bigelow Pond, Black Pond (Woodstock) WEST: Stillwater Pond, Westside Pond, Mount Tom Pond, Black Rock Pond Trout Park, and Great Hollow Trout Park.

CONNECTICUT RIVER
BLACK CRAPPIE action is improving in the coves up and down the river. Target the backwaters with small shiners, silver grubs, or small Rapalas. SMALLMOUTH BASS have been reported as hit or miss in from Hartford upstream. LARGEMOUTH BASS are being caught (but you have to work for them) in the Hartford to Haddam area. CARP are providing action in coves and in the mainstem, especially Salmon River Cove and the Middletown area. BOWFIN can be found in backwater areas with dense weeds especially in Keeney Cove, Crow Point Pond, and Chapman’s Cove. NORTHERN PIKE fishing is reported as good in the main stem and coves.

NOTES & NOTICES:

CANDLEWOOD LAKE (boat launches). Boaters using the Lattins Cove launch should take extra care. The launch ramp is damaged, with the bottom of the ramp broken up and a large drop off. Plans for repairs are in process and a sign is being posted to mark the end of the ramp surface. Backing down beyond that sign is not recommended at this time. The lake level is also down close to the minimum “summer” level, at which launching of trailered boats (especially larger boats) becomes more difficult (but usually still doable) at Lattins Cove. The Squantz Cove state launch is fully functional.

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert) Last year hydrilla was found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse). There are now reports of plants found at other locations along the river including Wethersfield and Crow Point coves and at a site in Enfield.

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

HIGHLAND LAKE (boat launch). The state boat launch on highland Lake is currently scheduled to be closed for line repainting on October 11th and reopening the next day (October 12th).

LAKE HOUSATONIC (rowing regatta). The “Head of the Housatonic” Regatta is scheduled for Saturday, October 7th from 8 am to 6 pm, with course setup occurring on Friday, October 6th . Although this event will be using the boat launch in Indian Well State Park, room will be available to the general public to launch. Boaters should however use additional caution on the lake.

LAKE HOUSATONIC (drawdown). The lake will be drawn down three feet beginning Sunday night, October 8, and ending Saturday, October 14, for maintenance. Launching trailered boats from the state boat launch will be very difficult to impossible.

PACHAUG POND (drawdown). A 3.5-foot drawdown to facilitate dam maintenance is scheduled to begin on Tuesday, October 10.

WEST HILL POND (drawdown). A 5-foot drawdown is ongoing to facilitate dam maintenance.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high
resolution) photos by November 1 to Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject
line.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription.

MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are around 70°F.

WHALES HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN LONG ISLAND SOUND (in early July, juvenile humpback whales have been spotted on the New York side of the sound), PLEASE CHECK WHALE WATCHING GUIDELINES.

Note: All marine mammals are protected by the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. Following these recommended operational guidelines helps minimize chances of harassing or injuring whales and violating Federal law. Guidelines apply to all large whales from Maine through Virginia, except North Atlantic right whales. It is illegal to approach a right whale within 500 yards (1500 feet) unless granted specific exemption or authorization.

SEE A TANGLED TURTLE? CALL THE HOTLINE: 1-860-572-5955 ext. 107. This is the time of year when leatherback, loggerhead, green, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles return to northern waters, with many sightings around Long Island Sound.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

ATLANTIC BONITO & LITTLE TUNNY fishing is good. Schools of these small tuna have been reported from New Haven to Greenwich. But they seem to be particularly fond of Cockenoe Island, Sunken Island, The Cows, and off Compo Beach. Smaller Hogy Epoxy lures, Zoom Super Fluke, Deadly Dicks, Sluggos and Albie Snacks (amber color) have all been very effective. There have been so many sighting of false albacore around the Norwalk Islands that some anglers are comparing the venue to the albies off Watch Hill. If you’re using braided line with a 20 lb fluorocarbon leader stop by your local tackle shop and ask them to show you a proper knot – there’s nothing worse than losing a little tunny because your knot slipped through the slick braid. Although false albacore are poor for eating – just catching one will give you such a fight you will be bragging about it for weeks. There is a good chance your local party boat has run into a few schools treating customers with a great day of fishing.

STRIPED BASS fishing is fantastic. It is time for shore anglers to hit the SURF…locate your favorite coastal state park(s). The fall season appears to be starting strong, with many charter boat operators commenting on how many large bass there are. These bass are migrating and feeding heavily on all the bait. The best thing is…you catch them during the daytime, especially under overcast skies. Trolling weighted jigs (chartreuse) with a yellow pork rind and or live lining bunker (Atlantic menhaden) in 15 to 40 feet of water. I like dunking a live eel on the reefs/shoal areas during the late afternoon /evening hours. This technique has produces some very big bass recently (52 inches – 48 pounds, (Outer Bartlett Reef & Norwalk Islands). Striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, Ram Island Reef in Fishers Island Sound, lower Mystic and Thames River, the Race, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, the “humps’ south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (breakwalls) and the upper reaches, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Milford Point, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

BLACK SEA BASS and SCUP (porgy) fishing is still phenomenal. I would recommend to get out while it’s good, these excellent eating fish won’t be hanging around forever. Double your chances by using a high-low rig tipped with clams and/or squid. Once you get a bite make sure to set the hook and whether releasing or keeping, be careful of the spines. We highly recommend heavy chumming; although you do not need to feed the entire ocean – chumming really gets black sea bass and scup in a feeding frenzy. Great porgy fishing this week are; Buoy 32A, Hens & Chickens near Captains Harbor in Greenwich, Fort Nathan Hale Beach (pier under construction), Pleasure Beach Family Pier, Short and Long Beach in Stratford and Silver Sands State Park in Milford, The Wall in Stratford, South Benson Pier, Ash Creek, Saint Marys by the Sea, Seaside Park, Fayerweather Island, Sherwood Island State Park, Calf Pasture Beach Pier, Cummings Park, Shippan Point and Todds Point on the southwest side facing New York skyline. Try your luck at one of CT’s wonderful Enhanced Opportunity Shore Fishing sites where the length limit for porgy (scup) is 9” as opposed to non-enhanced sites, which have the standard 10” length limit. List of some very accessible shore fishing locations are: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Seaside Park, (Milford), Bradley Point Park (West Haven), New Haven, Harkness State Park, Rocky Neck State Park, Kimberley Reef (Guilford), Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH The “blitz” is on and bluefish schools mixed with striped bass are reigning supreme. Jennings Beach, Walnut Beach, mouth of the Housatonic, Greens Ledge Lighthouse, Middle-ground (especially Stratford Shoal Lighthouse), The Cows, Sunken Island, the Norwalk Islands, Pennfield Reef, Todds Point, mouth of Rowaytons Five Mile River, Fish Island in Darien, Sasco Beach, Sandy Point, Black Rock Harbor and Gulf Beach Pier and Gulf Beach Break-wall are all excellent striped bass and bluefish locales. As for bluefish bait, well you could probably could put a taco on your hook and catch one because they are voracious eaters. But Atlantic mackerel and bunker (Atlantic menhaden) are good bait choices. Striped bass are a little pickier than bluefish, but topwater plugs are working well. There are some large holdover stripers available but the smaller juveniles are really on fire this week. Plastics are very effective on the 14”-24” striped bass inhabiting our lower rivers this fall. Anglers are having a blast catching smaller striped bass on the Housatonic and Norwalk Rivers. Bait fish like to take refuge in harbors, rivers and estuaries at night, so the rule still goes that the best fishing is at dusk and dawn.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) REMINDER TO ANGLERS: OPENING DAY FOR TAUTOG (BLACKFISH) IS OCTOBER 10TH! Any of the rocky reefs, rock piles, and wrecks in Long Island Sound will hold tog. Green, Asian shore or hermit crabs all work. Consider putting the crab (bait) on a jig (1/4 to 1 ounce). It will be a shallow water bite (6-30 feet) this early in the season. I would highly recommend planning a trip on a party/charter boat trip to fish for tautog. As you prepare for the season here are two quick tips; if you dunk a green/Asian shore or hermit crab in the water, and there is a tautog there – you will get a hit. Jigs tipped with a crab is an awesome technique for tautogs hanging tight to the reef. If you are not getting hits, you are fishing in a site void of blackfish, so move to another location (reef). Also, try chumming to attract fish. The three break-walls at the entrance to New Haven Harbor sometimes hold very large blackfish. So enjoy the season, be safe and TIGHT LINES!

HICKORY SHAD fishing is good in the Black Hall River/Lieutenant River (out-going tide), Housatonic River and the lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier). Fishing remains good at Fort Trumbull, Black Hall, Clinton Harbor River systems and the lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier).

 

BLUE CRAB fishing is good. Remember…all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Legal gear types include scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland style crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle dip net) and a small circular crab trap is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs. Blue Crab Fact Sheet


Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 09/07/2017

INLAND REPORT

LARGEMOUTH BASS – fishing is reported as very good. Places where the largemouth are eager to bite include West Hill Pond, East Twin Lake, Gardner Lake, Pickerel Lake, Beseck Lake, Amos Lake, Beach Pond, Highland Lake, Seymour Reservoir #4, Crystal Lake, Mudge Pond, West Side Pond, Tyler Lake, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Dog Pond, Hatch Pond, Park Pond, Lake Wononskopomuc, Lake Saltonstall, Bishop Swamp, Winchester Lake, Congamond Lakes, Quinebaug Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Burr Pond, Griggs Pond, Anderson Pond, Billings Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Aspinook Pond, Babcock Pond, Pachaug Pond, Lake Hayward, Quonnipaug Lake, Rogers Lake and Stillwater Pond.

Tournament angler are from Amos Lake (fair action, but lots of 2-3 lb fish in the bags and a 3.69 lb lunker), Pachaug Pond (fair for most, with 4.7 lb and 4.5 lb lunkers), Powers Lake (fair at best, with no size with a 1.87 lb lunker), for an evening tourney, Lake Lillinonah (fair to good, 3.07 lb and 3.02 lb lunkers), and Wononskopomuc Lake (fair to good for most, fish averaged a bit over 2 lbs apiece, but no really large ones, just a 3.56 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS – Catches reported from Candlewood Lake, Housatonic River (Upper), Naugatuck River, Lake McDonough, Lake Zoar and Lake Lillinonah. Housatonic River smallmouth fishing has been good.

Tournament angler reports are from Pachaug Pond (as usual, a few in the bags, including a 2.8 lb lunker), and Lake Lillinonah (fair for smallmouth).

CARP are keeping rods bent in Lake Lillinonah, Connecticut River (Hartford and Wethersfield Cove), Lower Farmington River, lower Quinebaug River, lower Housatonic River, and Aspinook Pond.

KOKANEE are slow, with a few reports from East Twin Lake (early morning) and West Hill Pond (early night fishing with corn, south end).

NORTHERN PIKE – Little info this week to help you target these awesome fish. Places to fish include Bantam Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Connecticut River and its coves (Hartford to Haddam), and Pachaug Pond.

WALLEYE – fishing appears fair to poor. Look for Walleye in the evening or early morning along steep drops in Mount Tom, Saugatuck Reservoir. Squantz Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, West Thompson Lake, Gardner Lake, or Mashapaug Lake.

CATFISH – great fishing is ongoing in our Catfish Management Lakes and many Community Fishing Waters. The deeper “holes” in the Connecticut River and Housatonic River are also producing some 4-8 pounders. Try cut fish or live shiners to entice a cat to bite.

PANFISH – one word- excellent. For some great family fun try shore fishing in shallow areas with a popper.

FALLFISH (DACE) – are the largest native minnow and can reach over 15 inches (typically 8-12 inches). Fallfish provide excellent action on ultra-light tackle and fly rods. The fish are aggressive and will hit a variety of natural and artificial baits (use the same gear you would for trout). Fishing for Fallfish is a great way to spend time on a river.

Good Fallfish waters include the Willimantic River, Shetucket River, Natchaug River, Lower Farmington River (Avon-Windsor), Housatonic River (Cornwall to Kent), Scantic River (Somers to East Windsor), and Yantic River. The current state record Fallfish (2.25 pounds) was taken in 2012 by Chad Tessman.

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS – Conditions for trout fishing remain good and will improve with the forthcoming fall stocking. Flows are very fishable.

We encourage you to fish one of the many Wild Trout Management Areas. These waters harbor incredibly colorful fish year-round. Worth some time and effort. Check out the “Go Wild” map in our new application “CT is Fishy” to find a new place to fish close to you.

Farmington River – Fishing remains very good and forecast conditions should be really good this weekend following the addition of 1,400 stocked brown trout from New Hartford to Unionville (a reminder that as of September 1, the fishing is catch and release). The West Branch flows are clear and should be steadily dropping through the weekend (currently 49 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River at 126 CFS) and morning water temperatures ranging from the mid to upper 50’s °F below the dam to the mid 60’s °F through New Hartford.

 

Hatches/patterns are shifting to the fall patterns with good numbers of flying ants (recent afternoons) and black caddis. Other perennial favorites include Isonychia bicolor (#10-14, fast water, evening), Tricos (#24), Blue Wing Olives (Drunella sps. & Baetis sps.;#18, 20-24, mid-late afternoon), Cahills/Summer (Stenonema ithaca, #12-14, evenings), Caddis (tan #16-18, all day; green #22-26, evening; summer pupa #18-20 morning), Midges (#22-32, morning), Black Ants (#14-20, mid-day in fast water), Black Beetles (#14-18, mid-day), and Stone Hopper (#8-14, mid-day) are successful patterns. Try a “muddler minnow” to trigger that big ‘bow into hitting your line.

Housatonic River – Fishing has been very good and conditions for the weekend should be good following recent stocking of 4,000 Brown Trout in the Trout Management Area (Sharon to Cornwall) and 500 Brown Trout into the Bull’s Bridge and Tenmile River TMA (Kent). Flows are high and have yet to stabilize from the rain earlier this week. The river is fishable, but flows are more like early spring (currently 725 CFS at Falls Village and 1,090 CFS at Gaylordsville). Morning water temperatures continue in the upper 60’s to low 70’s°F. Can’t go wrong taking a few casts for Smallmouth (Sharon to Kent), Pike (Bull’s Bridge Area), Fallfish (Sharon to Kent), and Carp (Sharon or Bull’s Bridge area).

Hatches/patterns include a good number of Black Caddis. Patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers (go big- larval dobsonflies can be up to 4” in length and are a favorite food item), Muddlers, Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10). Other insects include flying ants (#14-16, mid-day, when windy/humid, September is peak month), Fall Sulfurs (#16-18), Blue Wing Olives (#18-22), Tricos (#20-22), Leadwing Coachman (#10-12 evening, September is peak month), Sulfurs duns (#16-18, below the dam due to low temperatures, morning; afternoon to early evening for spinners), Light Cahill (#14-18, early morning & evening). Golden stonefly nymphs hatch at first light and adults egg-lay after dark.

Streamer fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies is usually productive. Streamer patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers (#2-12), Muddlers, Lion Buggers, and Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10). Light Cahill (#12- 14, evening), Isonychia (#10-12), Sulfur (#16-18) and Black caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening). Don’t forget poppers and streamers (morning & evening).

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS – Most lakes remain poor to fair. Best bets are to hit the traditional deep cold lakes like; East Twin Lake, West Branch Reservoir, Long Pond, West Hill Pond, Crystal Lake, or Highland Lake.

CONNECTICUT RIVER
LARGEMOUTH BASS are very active throughout the river and in the coves. Anglers are finding some chunky CATFISH by night angling in the Hartford to Middletown stretch. Try from just north of Hartford on downstream, fish the outside bends (deep holes are producing as well, try cut bait). CARP are being caught in the upper and lower river on pre-baited ‘swims’. SMALLMOUTH BASS are offering some decent action in the upper river (Windsor & Enfield area).

NOTES & NOTICES:

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert). Hydrilla was recently found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse).

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER (invasive species alert). Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard. Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

HIGHLAND LAKE (swimming & boating race). A canoe/kayak race and swim event is scheduled for Saturday,
September 9, at Highland Lake from 9:30 am to 12 pm. This event will be held in the “North Bay” at Resha and Holland beaches in the vicinity of the state boat launch. Boaters should use extra care when accessing the lake
from the state launch.

RAINBOW RESERVOIR (drawdown). The reservoir is being drawn down approximately 15 feet to facilitate
dam maintenance, making the state boat launch unusable. Work is currently expected to be completed by
September 13.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high resolution) photos at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject line. Youth Fishing Passport Fishing Challenge Scorecard: Download the new scorecard for your Youth Fishing Passport Holder on the program web page at www.ct.gov/deep/yfp. Top anglers will receive a great prize pack of fishing gear.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription.

MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the low to mid 70’sF.

WHALES HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN LONG ISLAND SOUND, PLEASE CHECK WHALE WATCHING GUIDELINES.

Note: All marine mammals are protected by the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. Following these recommended operational guidelines helps minimize chances of harassing or injuring whales and violating Federal law. Guidelines apply to all large whales from Maine through Virginia, except North Atlantic right whales. It is illegal to approach a right whale within 500 yards (1500 feet) unless granted specific exemption or authorization.

SEE A TANGLED TURTLE? CALL THE HOTLINE: 1-860-572-5955 ext. 107. This is the time of year when leatherback, loggerhead, green, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles return to northern waters, with many sightings around Long Island Sound.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

ATLANTIC BONITO & LITTLE TUNNY fishing remains sporadic, but getting better as each day passes. These small tunas are cruising around from Newport, Pt. Judith, Watch Hill to Pine Island (including Fishers Island Sound), and the Race to Little Gull Island, from Bartlett Reef to Black Point and west to New Haven. Dawn/dusk is the best time to fish for these inshore tunas. Try casting metal (heavy) lures to feeding fish on the surface. A quiet approach and finding birds (gulls/terns) actively feeding is the key to a successful trip.

STRIPED BASS remains very good at night. Hook up with a charter boat and learn how to catch those “cow” bass. Live lining bunker (Atlantic menhaden) on the reefs at dawn and dusk still producing some nice bass (56 inches – 58 pounds). Peanut Bunker and adult Bunker (Atlantic Menhaden) schools are scattered throughout the western Sound. Try using a “bunker snagger” and then live lining a whole bunker for that CT trophy fish award sized striped bass rather than cutting up the bunker into chunks. Striped Bass prefer a live Bunker. You want the deck stacked in your favor.

The usual striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, Ram Island Reef in Fishers Island Sound, lower Mystic and Thames River, the Race, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, the “humps’ south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor and the upper reaches, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

SUMMER FLOUNDER (fluke) is getting better as fall approaches (Season closes on September 21). They are feeding heavily prior to their migration south for the fall/winter. Summer Flounder (Fluke) in the 19″ range are being reeled in at Silver Sands and Gulf Beach, as well as Todds Point in Greenwich, Milford’s Anchor Beach and Hickory Bluff Bridge in the Rowayton section of Norwalk. Fishermen are reporting some very large doormat fluke being caught (10 lbs 4 ozs, western Sound). Live lining snapper blues in deep water (80 to 100’) is the preferred method by fluke sharpies in the fall. The usual summer flounder spots include the south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Napatree Point and along the beach, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River over to Groton Long Point, Twotree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay including the Bloody Grounds, Sound View Beach, Long Sand Shoal, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor, off the mouth of the Housatonic River during the flood tide, and around the Norwalk Islands. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 3 fish per person.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing has been very consistent in the Sound. Black sea bass are still around Can 12 and Can 16 off Milford and the Green Can “C” off Stratford Shoal Lighthouse. The sea bass have just finished spawning and are feeding heavily on crabs and small fish throughout Long Island Sound. Plan a trip on a party/charter boat trip to fish off Block Island. There are many giant-sized sea bass (5-7 lbs) out there. Eastern Sound (Fishers Island to Block Island and northeast of Montauk) anglers are having better success. For those willing to travel, Block Island Sound is the place to be for humpback sea bass. Closer to home, the rocky reefs from Niantic, to Branford (Falkner Island) have been consistent all season. A reminder to all anglers…if you are fishing in water deeper than 100’, barotrauma can cause released fish to struggle to make it back to the bottom. A descending devise such as the “Shelton Fish Descender” can help assist the sea bass air bladder to recompress and get safely back down to the depths. See Fishsmart.org for more information.

SCUP (porgy) fishing is good. The western Sound scup fishing has been on fire and this week catching 12″-17″ jumbos has barely raised an eyebrow. The trifecta of South Benson Pier, Ash Creek and Saint Mary’s has been fantastic. The Wall at Stratford, Pleasure Beach Family Pier, Silver Sands State Park, Walnut Beach, Long Beach in Stratford and Gulf Beach Breakwater and Sherwood Island State Park are all producing keeper porgy. Try Gardner’s Island, Milford (Charles Island), Montauk and Niantic (Bartletts and Hatchetts Reef).

Very accessible shore fishing locations: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Seaside Park, (Milford), Bradley Point Park (West Haven), New Haven, Harkness State Park, Rocky Neck State Park, Kimberley Reef (Guilford), Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH fishing very good. Large numbers of bluefish found in the lower estuaries and rivers feeding on menhaden. Eastern Sound has seen much better fishing for “alligator –sized” blues (11-17 lbs). Bluefish schools are still around although some have moved east. Nevertheless, there are still plenty around in the 2-5 pound and 6-8 pound class with an occasional 15 pounder. Bluefish are wonderful fighting fish but be careful handling them with their sharp teeth.

SNAPPER fishing has improved in the tidal creeks and rivers with fish measuring 6 to 12 inches in length.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) CLOSED until October 10, 2017

STRIPED SEAROBIN fishing continues to be steady for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. Also, called “Poor-Man’s Lobster”, these fish are very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With fish measuring over 22 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. There are videos on how to clean/fillet these tasty eating fish.

HICKORY SHAD fishing is good in the Black Hall River/Lieutenant River, Housatonic River and the lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier). Fishing remains good at Fort Trumbull, Black Hall, Clinton Harbor River systems and the lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier). Both snappers and hickory shad can be found schooling together at these locations.

WEAKFISH fishing is surprisingly good in the central and western Sound. Weakfish in the 16″-23″ range have been reported at Long Beach in Stratford. Many scup/sea bass anglers are catching them. Fish up to 26 inches are being reported in the West Haven beaches and Charles Island area. Also, look for weakfish in Guilford/Madison/New Haven Harbor areas.

NORTHERN KINGFISH fishing has been very good. Many reports this month from the western Sound including Walnut Beach and Sandy Point. Kingfish are found along hard sand bottom and frequent shallow water. Excellent fishing for the shore angler along with being excellent eating. If you play your cards right you might catch one of these beauties – great bragging rights.

BLUE CRAB fishing is very good in all tidal creeks and bays. Many of the large Jimmies (male crabs) have moved upstream. Incoming tide has produced better crab fishing…as the crabs migrate into the shallow water to feed. Remember, all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable harm. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Legal gear types include scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland style crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle dip net) and a small circular crab trap is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs. Blue Crab Fact Sheet – Angler’s please also note: It is illegal to snag blue crabs.


Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 8/18/2017

INLAND REPORT

LARGEMOUTH BASS – fishing is generally reported as good. Night fishing is productive. Try black jitterbugs and surface poppers. Places to try include Lake McDonough, West Hill Pond, East Twin Lake, Gardner Lake, Pickerel Lake, Beseck Lake, Amos Lake, Beach Pond, Highland Lake, Seymour Reservoir #4, Crystal Lake, Mudge Pond, West Side Pond, Tyler Lake, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Dog Pond, Hatch Pond, Park Pond, Lake Wononskopomuc, Lake Saltonstall, Bishop Swamp, Winchester Lake, Congamond Lakes, Quinebaug Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Burr Pond, Griggs Pond, Anderson Pond, Billings Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Aspinook Pond, Babcock Pond, Pachaug Pond, Lake Hayward, Quonnipaug Lake, Rogers Lake and Stillwater Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Lake of Isles (dismal day, but a 4.61 lb lunker), Long Pond (fair at best, with a 2.8 lb lunker), Quaddick Lake (a “fun day” for one club, with nearly all full bags, a 6.13 lb lunker and an average fish weight of 2 lbs apiece), Rogers Lake (good action for most, with a 3.94 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair, 5.05 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (on the tough side for largemouth, with a 2.65 lb lunker), and the Connecticut River (slow to fair, 4.06 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS – Catches reported from Candlewood Lake, Housatonic River (Upper), Naugatuck River, Lake McDonough, Lake Zoar and Lake Lillinonah. Housatonic River smallmouth fishing has been good.

Tournament angler reports are from Candlewood Lake (fair, 5.66 lb and 3.8 lb lunkers), Lake Lillinonah (good fishing for smallmouth, 4.3 lb lunker), and the Connecticut River (a couple for a club out of Salmon River launch).

WALLEYE – playing hard to get but decent fish are out there. Places to try include Lake Saltonstall, Saugatuck Reservoir. Squantz Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, West Thompson Lake, Mount Tom Pond, Gardner Lake, and Mashapaug Lake.

NORTHERN PIKE – decent fish reported from Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Quaddick Reservoir, and Housatonic River (HOT).

CARP were caught in Lake Zoar, Hanover Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Aspinook Pond, and the Lower Housatonic River (New Milford).

PANFISH – has been excellent this season so far. For some great summer time fun try shore fishing in shallow areas. This simple and inexpensive method is the best way to get into them, small grubs, worms or shiners and bobber will put fish in your creel. Both small local ponds and larger waters work great. Areas reporting action include Wood Creek Pond, Tyler Lake, Lake Hayward, Morey Pond, Peck Pond, Crescent Lake (Southington), West Side Pond, Freshwater Pond, Dog Pond and Zeiner Pond.

KOKANEE catches were reported from East Twin Lake (early morning) and West Hill Pond (early night fishing with corn, south end). Target 30-35 feet with down riggers on beads.

CATFISH – Good fishing is ongoing in our Catfish Management Lakes including; Keeney Park Pond (Hartford), Black Pond (Middlefield), Spaulding Pond (Norwich) and Silver Lake (Meriden). CT River continues to provide solid fish.

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS – Conditions for trout fishing remain fair to good so far this August, the mostly moderate temperatures continue and flows are generally around typical early-mid August levels (see stream flow graphic on page 4). A few decent fish are still coming out of our larger rivers like the Quinebaug River, the West Branch Farmington River, Farmington River, Housatonic River, Mount Hope River, Salmon River and Willimantic River. Terrestrials are very important this time of the year and we encourage anglers to include them in their offerings.

Farmington River – Fishing remains very good and forecast conditions should be good again for this weekend. West Branch flows are clear, moderate and just continue to be very fishable (currently 229 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River adding 22 CFS) and morning water temperatures ranging from the mid to upper 50’s °F below the dam to the mid 60’s °F through New Hartford.

Rock Snot is still “blooming”. Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard.

Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through August. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

Hatches/patterns are a mixed bag of a variety of patterns including Tricos (Tricorythodes #22-24 in the morning; started in the mid-section of the river), Ephemerella needhami (#22-26, early morning), Leadwing Coachman (Isonychia bicolor, #12-14, fast water, afternoon/evening), Blue Wing Olives (Drunella sps. & Baetis sps.; #18, 22-24, mid-late afternoon), Caddis (tan #16-20, all day; green #22-26, evening; summer pupa #18-20 morning), Cahills/Summer (Stenonema ithaca, #12-14, early morning), Midges (#22-28, morning), Black Ants (#12-18, mi day in fast water), Black Beetles (#16-18, midday), Flying Ants (#18-22, midday, when windy/humid), Stone Hopper (#8-12, mid-day).

Housatonic River – Fishing has been good and conditions for the weekend should be good. Flows are clear, a bit below typical mid-August levels (currently 397 CFS at Falls Village and 557 CFS at Gaylordsville), and are just perfect for wading. Morning water temperatures continue in the upper 60’s to low 70’s°F. Super action for Smallmouth, Pike, Fallfish, and Carp. All are on fire now hitting a variety of poppers and streamers.

Hatches/patterns include the White Fly hatch with some Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8-10, Alder flies are very active during hot days), Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Light Cahill (#12-14, evening), (Isonychia bicolor, #10-12 has been active lately, fast water, evening) and Black caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening). Streamer fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies have been very productive. Streamer patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers (#2-12), Muddlers, Lion Buggers, and Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10). Light Cahill (#12-14, evening), Isonychia (#10-12), Sulfur (#16-18) and Black caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening). Don’t forget poppers and streamers (morning & evening). Patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers, Muddlers, Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10). Also try brown crayfish like streamers, they are effective right now.

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS – Most lakes are poor; some fair to good fishing. Best bet are the deeper cooler lakes like; Lake McDonough (orange/silver Flash Kings at 7 colors, near outlet), East Twin Lake (Thinfish Copper; Mooselook Wobbler blue/silver at 30 feet), Beach Pond (Kobra 114, 18 or 5, rigger at 23’ feet), Long Pond (streamers), West Hill Pond (south end), Crystal Lake (Ellington, at 7-8 colors, 40 feet of water) and Highland Lake (second bay, 25-30 feet).

CONNECTICUT RIVER
LARGEMOUTH BASS are being taken in the coves in the mid to lower river. Anglers are finding CATFISH by night angling in the Hartford to Middletown stretch. Try from just north of Hartford on downstream, fish the outside bends (deep holes are producing as well, try cut bait). CARP are being caught in the upper and lower river on pre-baited ‘swims’. Last week, SMALLMOUTH BASS were caught in the northern river (Windsor & Enfield area). Small to medium size bait were working well. Try 3-4 inch rubber worms on 3/8 ounce football jigs or 2.5 inch paddle tail worms. Surface poppers in that size range can also be effective.

NOTES & NOTICES:

PROPOSED CHANGES TO INLAND FISHERIES REGULATIONS.

DEEP‘s Fisheries Division is currently proposing to make changes to the Inland sport fishing regulations and to establish trout and salmon stamps.

The proposed changes to the regulations will establish trout and Atlantic salmon stamps, and amend regulations concerning methods and gear types, fishing seasons for several waterbodies, harvest regulations for certain species (common carp, catfish and bullheads), Trout Management Areas, Wild Trout Management Areas, Atlantic Salmon “Broodstock Areas,” Trout Parks, and Trophy Carp Waters.

DEEP’s proposed changes to Inland Fisheries Regulations (effective 2018) are currently open for public comment until 4:30 pm on August 25, 2017.

For more information on proposed changes, how to comment on them and the public hearing, go to Connecticut’s “eRegulations” system at https://eregulations.ct.gov or contact the Fisheries Division at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov or by phone at 860-424-3474.

 

CONNECTICUT RIVER (Hartford, boating event). Riverfront Recapture will be holding its annual “Dragon Boat Races” on Saturday, August 19 (8 am – 5 pm) with course set up on Friday, August 18 on the CT River in Hartford between the Founders Bridge and the Charter Oak Bridge. Boat travel through the course area will be difficult during the race events, use extra caution or avoid the area.

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert). Hydrilla was recently found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse).

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER (invasive species alert). Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard. Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high resolution) photos at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject line. Youth Fishing Passport Fishing Challenge Scorecard: Download the new scorecard for your Youth Fishing Passport Holder on the program web page at www.ct.gov/deep/yfp. Top anglers will receive a great prize pack of fishing gear.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription.

MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the upper 70’sF.

 

WHALES HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN LONG ISLAND SOUND, PLEASE CHECK WHALE WATCHING GUIDELINES.

Note: All marine mammals are protected by the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. Following these recommended operational guidelines helps minimize chances of harassing or injuring whales and violating Federal law. Guidelines apply to all large whales from Maine through Virginia, except North Atlantic right whales. It is illegal to approach a right whale within 500 yards (1500 feet) unless granted specific exemption or authorization.

SEE A TANGLED TURTLE? CALL THE HOTLINE: 1-860-572-5955 ext. 107. This is the time of year when leatherback, loggerhead, green, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles return to northern waters, with many sightings around Long Island Sound.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

STRIPED BASS fishing continues to be fair. August is a tough time of year to target “linesiders” – your best bet to hook up with a big “cow” is to fish at night or in the early morning with live bait or big plugs, as most big stripers are relatively inactive during the hot “dog days” of August. Big striped bass are particularly prone to stress from hooking and handling during the warm summer months – so do your best to release these fish with as little handling as possible. We have heard reports of a fair number of smaller striped bass being taken on diamond jigs along with the abundant bluefish in the eastern Sound (see below), and reports of smaller stripers being taken by anglers casting lures on the evening ebb tide at the Watch Hill reefs. Another option is to seek out schools of adult Atlantic menhaden “bunker” in the tidal rivers and harbors and look for striped bass following these schools of their preferred prey (this is a particularly promising option for the western Sound). Look for hovering or diving ospreys which is an indication of bunker schools.

The usual striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, Ram Island Reef in Fishers Island Sound, lower Mystic and Thames River, the Race, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, the “humps’ south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor and the upper reaches, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

SUMMER FLOUNDER (fluke) reports were good this last week, with many anglers reporting an uptick in catch rates with the influx of bait into the nearshore areas of the Sound. This time of year, your best bet for fluke is to either “go deep”, targeting areas around rock piles and reefs in 80-120 feet of water, or “go shallow” and fish jigs or bait on light tackle along channel edges up inside coastal rivers and harbors. You might be surprised by the abundance and size of fluke you find in these inshore areas – these “doormats” will come in close to forage on the abundant baitfish available in estuaries this time of year. We also continue to hear good reports of fluke fishing from Fort Trumbull fishing pier in New London.

Other tried and true summer flounder spots include the south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Napatree Point and along the beach, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River over to Groton Long Point, Twotree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay including the Bloody Grounds, Sound View Beach, Long Sand Shoal, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor, off the mouth of the Housatonic River during the flood tide, and around the Norwalk Islands. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 3 fish per person.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is excellent right now in almost all areas of the Sound. We heard excellent reports of fishing for big “humpheads” in the Race and at Pigeon Rip this last week during the slower portions of the tide. Fishing over almost any deep water structure/cobble/gravel in 80 to 120 ft around slack tide will produce black sea bass. They will readily eat cut bait like squid and clams on a hi-lo rig – but if you want to weed out the smaller fish and target the trophies, try jigging small metal jigs or bucktails on a light spinning rod – you’ll catch bigger fish and have a blast doing it. Black sea bass tend to school up by size – so if you’re in an area where you’re consistently catching undersized fish – move on to a different area to find a school of bigger fish. This will increase your chances of catching keepers, and will also reduce the likelihood of incidental mortality of smaller fish that you release.

SCUP (porgy) fishing is good. Abundant large “pie plates” have been reported from many areas. These fish are readily caught from many shore locations and are a great option for spending an enjoyable afternoon of fishing by the shore. Try Gardner’s Island, Milford (Charles Island), Montauk and Niantic (Bartlett’s and Hatchett’s Reef). Good porgy fishing has also been reported at these very accessible shore fishing locations: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Seaside Park, (Milford), Bradley Point Park (West Haven), New Haven, Harkness State Park, Rocky Neck State Park, Kimberley Reef (Guilford), Meig’s Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH fishing is nothing short of fantastic right now in Long Island Sound. Diamond jigs, bucktails, and chunk baits (like bunker or mackerel) will help you score a “gator” during the day, and casting poppers or plugs at sunrise or sunset is also a great way to hook into a big “chopper”. Typical bluefish fishing spots include the reefs off Watch Hill, the Race, Thames River, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, lower Connecticut River (CT DEEP Headquarters Fishing Pier), Long Sand Shoal, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor and upper reaches, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middleground, Penfield Reef, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Reports from the eastern Sound (the Race and nearby areas) have been particularly good this last week.

SNAPPER BLUEFISH fishing is hitting its stride in the tidal creeks and rivers, with reports steadily improving over the last week. The DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and Fort Trumbull fishing pier are two great spots to catch these feisty little fish – your local tackle shop can clue you in to other great spots. Snapper fishing is a fantastic way to introduce kids to saltwater fishing – get those kids out of the house and get a rod in their hands before summer is over!

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing not a common target species during the summer months, but those in the know can enjoy some great fishing for these “Reef Bullies”. Unlike during the fall, blackfish can be readily caught in very shallow water in nearshore areas during the summer. One great way to target these fish is to cast blackfish jigs tipped with cut crabs in shallow reef areas using a spinning rod, slowly and carefully working the jig along the bottom. Consult your local tackle store for more info on this highly effective technique. Spearfishing is also a fun and exciting way to target “togs” during the summer. Remember – the daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches.

STRIPED SEAROBIN can be readily caught while bottom fishing with bait in many locations, and will also surprise the occasional angler by striking a lure meant for bluefish or striped bass. They make for great action on light tackle, with fish measuring over 22 inches a possibility, and despite their unusual appearance, these fish make for delicious eating. If you’ve never tried this “Poor-Man’s Lobster” – you’re missing out! There are plenty of videos online showing how to fillet these fish. Kids also will get a kick out of these noisy creatures, as they tend to make all kinds of barking and grunting noises when caught.

BLUE CRAB fishing is good and getting better – we are in the peak season now for catching these feisty and delicious crustaceans. Taking kids blue crabbing is great family fun, so get down to the shoreline to get in on the action while summer is still with us. Blue crabs prefer coves and tidal creeks with mud bottoms. There are a number of great spots for crabbing on the Connecticut shoreline – contact your local bait and tackle store for tips on where to go and how to do it. Remember, all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury, and the minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please promptly release all undersized crabs and egg bearing females so that they can ensure good crabbing in the years to come. Legal gear types include scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle dip net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs. Blue Crab Fact Sheet


Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 8/10/2017

INLAND REPORT

LARGEMOUTH BASS – fishing continues to be fair to good. Night fishing is good, try black jitterbugs and surface poppers. Places to try include Candlewood Lake (flipping weeds daytime, spinner baits and Jig & pigs working at night), Lake Lillinonah (topwater first thing in morning), Bantam Lake, Mudge Pond, Hatch Pond, Park Pond, Lake Wononskopomuc, Lake Saltonstall, Bishop Swamp, Highland Lake, Lake McDonough, Winchester Lake, Congamond Lakes, Quinebaug Pond, Black Pond (Meriden), Burr Pond, Tyler Lake, Griggs Pond, Crystal Lake, Billings Lake, Pickerel Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Aspinook Pond, Quaddick Lake, Babcock Pond, Pachaug Pond, Lake Hayward, Quonnipaug Lake, Rogers Lake and Stillwater Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Aspinook Pond (fair to good, 4.04 lb and 3.5 lb lunkers), Rogers Lake (good for some, tough for some, 5.0 lb and 4.93 lb lunkers), Bantam Lake (5.27 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair to good, 5.05 lb, 4.0 lb and 3.8 lb lunkers), East Twin Lake (fair), Winchester Lake (fair for most, very good for a few, 6 lb lunker), and the Connecticut River (good action, 3.49 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS – Action reported from Candlewood Lake (look around humps), Lake McDonough, Squantz Pond, Lake Zoar and Lake Lillinonah. Some very good reports in for river smallmouth from the upper Housatonic River, also some action on the Quinebaug River and the Naugatuck River.

Tournament angler reports are from Aspinook Pond (some fish, 2.8 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (good for those targeting smallies, including a 5.66 lb lunker), and the Connecticut River (fair action).

WALLEYE – No reports this week, places to try include Lake Saltonstall, Saugatuck Reservoir. Squantz Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, West Thompson Lake, Mount Tom Pond, Gardner Lake, and Mashapaug Lake.

NORTHERN PIKE – Places to try for pike include Bantam Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Pachaug Pond, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Quaddick Lake (try up in Stump Pond), Hopeville Pond, the Connecticut River, the Housatonic River (Bulls Bridge area), and Winchester Lake. Weedlines early and late in the day typically hold pike.

CHAIN PICKEREL are keeping anglers busy throughout the state, with some big fish reported from Congamond Lakes and Bantam lake.

PANFISH – Fishing is very good. For some great summer time fun try shore fishing in shallow areas (your local ponds are often great places). Small grubs, worms or shiners and bobber will put fish in your creel. Small spinners and jigs have been very productive as well. Try small fly rods. Many of your local small ponds can provide great action. Larger waters to try include Mono Pond, Shenipsit Lake, Mohegan Park Pond, Morey Pond, North Farms Reservoir, Long Pond, Ross Pond, Babcock Pond, Mono Pond, Halls Pond, Barber Pond, Farmill Reservoir, Schreeder Pond, Roseland Lake, Norwich Pond, Peck Pond, Quaddick Reservoir, Zemko Pond, Wood Creek Pond, Park Pond and Stanley Quarter Pond. Black Crappie continue to provide action. Giant Yellow Perch are being caught at Candlewood Lake.

Check out and download the FREE- CARE “Let’s Go Fishing” Workbook available on the DEEP website at www.ct.gov/deep/care.

KOKANEE catches were reported from East Twin Lake (mostly 12 inch fish) and West Hill Pond (early and at night, fishing with corn).

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS – Conditions for trout fishing are fair to good so far this August, the mostly moderate temperatures continue and flows are generally around typical early-mid August levels. A few decent fish are still coming out of our larger rivers like the Quinebaug River, the West Branch Farmington River, Farmington River, Housatonic River, Hammonasset River, Natchaug River, Mount Hope River, Salmon River and Willimantic River. Terrestrial fly patterns (beetles, ants, and grasshoppers) are very important this time of the year and anglers are advised to include them in their offerings.

Farmington River – Fishing remains very good and forecast conditions should be good again for this weekend. West Branch flows are clear, moderate and just continue to be very fishable (currently 256 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River adding 25 CFS) and morning water temperatures ranging from the mid to upper 50’s °F below the dam to the mid 60’s °F through New Hartford.

Rock Snot is still “blooming”. Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard.

Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through August. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

Hatches/patterns include Isonychia (#10-14, fast water), Summer and Winter Caddis (#18-24, good all day), Needhami (#24-26), Cahill & Light Cahill (#12-14), March Brown nymphs (#10-12), Blue Wing Olives (#18-20, also some smaller ones, #22- 24, in the evening), Sulphur (#16-18, only up in the Riverton- Hogback Dam area), Black Ants (#14-18, midday in fast water), Black Beetles (#12-16, midday), Flying Ants (#18-22, midday, when windy/humid), and Midges (#20-32, morning). Summertime terrestrials (beetles, ants, and grasshoppers) are the go to throughout the day and nymphing/streamers from late morning to early evening.

Housatonic River – Fishing has been good and conditions for the weekend should be good. Flows are clear, a bit below typical mid-August levels (currently 258 CFS at Falls Village and 406 CFS at Gaylordsville), and are just perfect for wading. Morning water temperatures continue in the upper 60’s °F. On hotter days switch from trout to Smallmouth, Pike, Fallfish, and Carp, they’re on fire now hitting a variety of poppers and streamers.

Hatches/patterns include the White Fly hatch with some Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8-10, Alder flies are very active during hot days), Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Light Cahill (#12-14, evening), (Isonychia bicolor, #10-12 has been active lately, fast water, evening) and Black caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening). Streamer fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies have been very productive. Streamer patterns to try include White Zonkers, Wooly Buggers (#2-12), Muddlers, Lion Buggers, and Grey or Black Ghosts (#4-10).

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS – Summer trout fishing remains quiet as the dearth of reports continue. Fishing has been fair at Crystal Lake (20-30 feet), Colebrook Reservoir and East Twin Lake. Candlewood Lake recently gave up a 3.5 lb brown trout.

CONNECTICUT RIVER. The river continues to be comfortable for fishing and boating, although getting into some of those more hard to get into spots may be getting more difficult, as flows have dropped below typical mid-August levels. The good reports for LARGEMOUTH BASS continue, from below Hartford to Hamburg Cove (especially around the Salmon River). Anglers are reporting solid catches of CATFISH are being caught throughout the river. Night angling in the Hartford to Middletown stretch has been good. We recommend using some really stinky bait and setting up just upstream of a deep “hole”. CARP fishing on homemade baits has been productive from prebaited areas. Fish have been caught in the lower portion of the river. Good fishing for SMALLMOUTH BASS north of Hartford through Enfield/Windsor. Try top water plugs and 4 inch Mr. Twisters, flyfishing with small poppers, or Wacky Style salted worms in motor oil or chartreuse for these feisty jumpers.

NOTES & NOTICES:

PROPOSED CHANGES TO INLAND FISHERIES REGULATIONS.

DEEP‘s Fisheries Division is currently proposing to make changes to the Inland sport fishing regulations and to establish trout and salmon stamps.

The proposed changes to the regulations will establish trout and Atlantic salmon stamps, and amend regulations concerning methods and gear types, fishing seasons for several waterbodies, harvest regulations for certain species (common carp, catfish and bullheads), Trout Management Areas, Wild Trout Management Areas, Atlantic Salmon “Broodstock Areas,” Trout Parks, and Trophy Carp Waters.

DEEP’s proposed changes to Inland Fisheries Regulations (effective 2018) are currently open for public comment until 4:30 pm on August 25, 2017.

For more information on proposed changes, how to comment on them and the public hearing, go to Connecticut’s “eRegulations” system at https://eregulations.ct.gov or contact the Fisheries Division at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov or by phone at 860-424-3474.

BANTAM LAKE – The annual Waterski Exhibition will be held this upcoming weekend in North Bay on Friday, August 11 (4 pm to 8 pm), Saturday, August 12 (12:00 pm – 5 pm) and Sunday, August 13 (12:00 pm – 5 pm). Boaters should use caution in this area.

BRANFORD RIVER (boat launch). The Branford River state boat launch has reopened.

CONNECTICUT RIVER (Haddam – Essex – paddle craft regatta). A paddle event (kayaks, canoes, row boats, SUP’s) is scheduled for Sunday, August 13, from 8 am to 2 pm in the Haddam -Essex area. This event is a nine mile one-way race from Eagle Landing State Park (Haddam) south to the Connecticut River Museum (Essex). Boaters should use additional caution is this area.

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert). Hydrilla was recently found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse).

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

MUDGE POND. The swim portion of a triathlon will be conducted from 8 am to 9 am on Saturday, August 12, in the northern end of the pond, with start and finish at the Sharon Town Beach.

WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER (invasive species alert). Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard. Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high resolution) photos at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject line. Youth Fishing Passport Fishing Challenge Scorecard: Download the new scorecard for your Youth Fishing Passport Holder on the program web page at www.ct.gov/deep/yfp. Top anglers will receive a great prize pack of fishing gear.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription.

MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the low to mid 70’sF.

Saltwater Fishing at Fort Trumbull State Park

Our annual CARE and No Child Left Inside Summer Fishing Event will be held on Saturday, August 12, 2017 (coinciding with free fishing license day). The event will be at Fort Trumbull State Park from 10 am to 3 pm. Feel free to bring your own fishing gear or you can borrow ours. We will have bait too! A great time will be had by all.

Youth Fishing Passport holders- This is a great chance for you to “check off” several of the saltwater species on the “Fishing Challenge Scorecard”.

WHALES HAVE BEEN REPORTED IN LONG ISLAND SOUND, PLEASE CHECK WHALE WATCHING GUIDELINES.

Note: All marine mammals are protected by the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act. Following these recommended operational guidelines helps minimize chances of harassing or injuring whales and violating Federal law. Guidelines apply to all large whales from Maine through Virginia, except North Atlantic right whales. It is illegal to approach a right whale within 500 yards (1500 feet) unless granted specific exemption or authorization.

SHARK SPECIES YOU MAY ENCOUNTER IN COASTAL WATERS OF CONNECTICUT: Anglers may catch Sand Tiger and Sandbar (Brown) Shark which are protected and prohibited species and must be released unharmed. IF YOU DON’T KNOW, PLEASE LET IT GO! Coastal shark information.

SEE A TANGLED TURTLE? CALL THE HOTLINE: 1-860-572-5955 ext. 107. This is the time of year when leatherback, loggerhead, green, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles return to northern waters, with many sightings around Long Island Sound.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

STRIPED BASS fishing continues to be fair throughout the Sound. One must reef hop and hopefully get 1 or 2 bass on each reef. The nighttime is the right time. They are feeding on the young-of-year menhaden. Fishing should improve around the waning full moon. Bunker (Atlantic menhaden) schools are still in the major tidal rivers and harbors with stripers following close behind. Look for hovering or diving ospreys which is an indication of bunker (menhaden) schools. The usual striper spots include the Watch Hill reefs, Ram Island Reef in Fishers Island Sound, lower Mystic and Thames River, the Race, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, the “humps’ south of Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River, Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor and the upper reaches, Charles Island area, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

SUMMER FLOUNDER (fluke) fishing is improving with the influx of peanut bunker and snapper blues forcing the summer flounder to feed in shallow water. There have been some big fish caught off Black Point and Six Mile Reef measuring in the mid to high 20 inch range being reported. Fort Trumbull is the shore fishing hot spot…there have been some very impressive fluke (24”) caught there recently. Summer flounder spots include the south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Napatree Point and along the beach, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River over to Groton Long Point, Twotree Island Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay including the Bloody Grounds, Sound View Beach, Long Sand Shoal, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor, off the mouth of the Housatonic River during the flood tide, and around the Norwalk Islands. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 3 fish per person.

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is fantastic. They are carpeted throughout the bottom of the Sound. Fishing over deep water structure/cobble/gravel in 80 to 120 ft around slack tide will produce some trophysized “humpbacks” up to 25 “ on baited jigs or gulp. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure and fish around slack tide (stay close to the bottom) to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. They will eat anything you provide them (clams).

SCUP (porgy) fishing is good. These “Reef Slammers” are measuring 10-18 inches (“hubcap size”) in length being reported at every fishing pier, reef or rock pile in the Sound. Try Gardners Island, Milford (Charles Island), Montauk and Niantic (Bartletts and Hatchetts Reef). Porgy fishing has also been reported at these very accessible shore fishing locations: Calf Pasture beach, Jennings and Penfield beach, Seaside Park, (Milford), Bradley Point Park (West Haven), New Haven, Harkness State Park, Rocky Neck State Park, Kimberley Reef (Guilford), Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH fishing has improved on the major reefs and rip areas. Vertical jigging diamond jigs in deep water locations and using fresh bunker chunk baits on three way rigs in shallow water has been the ticket. Typical bluefish fishing spots include the reefs off Watch Hill, the Race, Thames River, Sluiceway, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, lower Connecticut River (CT DEEP Headquarters Fishing Pier), Long Sand Shoal, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor and upper reaches, lower Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middleground, Penfield Reef, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

SNAPPER BLUEFISH fishing is improving daily in the tidal creeks and rivers. The DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and Fort Trumbull fishing pier are two great spots to bring kids fishing & crabbing. Look for the schools of “peanut” bunker and you will find the snappers.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing is pretty good this summer. There are plenty of these “Reef Bullies” around the local reefs and pilings. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs and mussels…try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for “Togs” over shellfish beds, pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (10 to 45 ft). The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches.

STRIPED SEAROBIN fishing continues to be steady for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. Also, called “Poor-Man’s Lobster”, these fish are very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With fish measuring over 22 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. There are videos on how to clean/fillet these tasty eating fish.

BLUE CRAB fishing is good. Many crabs are molting and growing larger as we speak. Time to get out and try your favorite spot and enjoy the scenery and catch some crabs for dinner (crab cakes). There are a lot of smaller under-sized crabs out there. Remember… all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.

NOTABLE CATCHES:

  • American Eel 40” 5 lb 3 oz Alyssa Zuppe

     

  • Smooth Dogfish 42” 9 lb 2 oz Jennifer Zuppe

     

  • Smooth Dogfish 47” C&R Joselin Braun

     

  • Tautog 26” 11 lb 6 oz Jennifer Zuppe

     

  • Blue Crab 8.5” 1lb 1oz Alyssa Zuppe

Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 7/20/2017

INLAND REPORT

LARGEMOUTH BASS fishing is generally reported as good. Places to try include Highland Lake, Squantz Pond, Congamond Lakes, Lake Wononskopomuc, Lake McDonough, Candlewood Lake (try in 15 feet of water around outside edge of weed points), Silver Lake, Bantam Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Winchester Lake, Amos Lake, Hatch Pond, East Twin Lake, Amos Lake, Pachaug Pond, Quaddick Lake (lots of action reported), Lake Saltonstall, Shelton Reservoir, Mudge Pond, West Hill Pond, Aspinook Pond, Messerschimdt Pond, Lake Hayward, Rogers Lake, Pickerel Lake, Bishop Pond, Lake of Isles, Cedar Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Halls Pond and Beseck Lake.

Tournament angler reports are from Gardner Lake (fairgood for some, tough for many, 3.28 lb, 2.84 lb and 2.06 lb lunkers, lots of 1 lb fish), Quaddick Lake (good to very good for many, 4.75 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (slow for largemouth at night with a 4.57 lb lunker, better in the day but still fair at best with a 4.2 lb lunker), Lake McDonough (fair to good, but fish averaged less than 1 lb apiece, with a 4.5 lb lunker), and Lake Zoar (fair for largemouth, 4.55 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS Is slow in many lakes and ponds, but action can be found. Places to try include Candlewood Lake (black jitterbugs are finding some night action), Lake Zoar, Mashapaug Lake, Colebrook River Lake, and Lake McDonough. Fishing for river smallmouth is getting even better in the Housatonic River (and flows are perfect for wading), other rivers such as the Farmington river (Tariffville area), Naugatuck River, Shetucket River and Quinebaug River are also providing some action.

Tournament angler reports are from Candlewood Lake (fair to good for smallies at night with a 4.58 lb lunker, tough in the daytime), Lake McDonough (a few in the bags), and Lake Zoar (fair to good).

WALLEYE. Still slow, Walleye sharpies are working steep shorelines during dusk and early evening. Locations to try include Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, Gardner Lake, West Thompson Lake, Mount Tom Pond, and Mashapaug Lake. A nice Walleye was caught this week in the Connecticut River (north of Hartford).

NORTHERN PIKE. Anglers are finding some nice pike in Lake Lillinonah. Other places for pike include Bantam Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Quaddick Lake (try up in Stump Pond), Hopeville Pond, the Connecticut River, the upper Housatonic River, and Winchester Lake. Weedlines early and late in the day typically hold pike.

CHAIN PICKEREL are keeping anglers busy in a number of places throughout the state.

PANFISH are hot everywhere and the best bet for a fun family summer fishing excursion. All you need is a few worms and bobber. Your local smaller local ponds are often great places for sunnies, other suggested locations include Tyler Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Amos Pond, Barber Pond, Baummer Pond, Black Rock Lake, Burr Pond, Dooley Pond, Halls Pond, Lake of Isles, Lower Fulton Park Pond and McGrath Park Pond. Check out and download the FREECARE “Let’s Go Fishing” Workbook available on the DEEP website at www.ct.gov/deep/care. Some giant Yellow Perch are being caught in Candlewood Lake. White Perch continue to feed anglers at places like Lake Lillinonah and Shenipsit Lake.

KOKANEE continues to be spotty at both East Twin Lake (mostly 12 inch fish with some 14 inchers) and West Hill Pond. Try Beads, Mooselook Wobblers, DB Smelt, and Flash King lures (blue & silver); or fishing corn over lights at night.

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS. Conditions for the weekend should be good for summer fishing. Water temperatures remain generally moderate, flows continue to be more than adequate (at or above typical early July levels in most areas, especially in eastern CT – see stream flow graphic on page 5) thanks to recent passing storms. Still some quality fish in many rivers (although you have to put your time in and cover some ground) give these rivers a try: Natchaug, Hammonasset, Eight Mile (Salem), East Aspetuck, Norwalk, and Saugatuck rivers.

Farmington River – Fishing has been very good and should continue to be very good for the weekend and next week. Plenty of the large Brown Trout stocked just prior to July Fourth are still there, West Branch flows are clear, moderate and quite fishable (currently 259 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River adding 35 CFS) and water temperatures continue to range from the low 50’s °F below the dam to the mid 60’s °F by Collinsville.

Rock Snot is “blooming”. Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard.

Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

Hatches/patterns include Isonychia (#10-12, now through and up above the year-round C & R area as far as Riverton, try faster water), Caddis (#18-24, good all day), Cahill & Light Cahill (#12-14), March Brown nymphs (#10-12), Blue Wing Olives (#18-20), Sulphur, (Epeorus vitreus duns #16-18, afternoon to early evening for spinners), and Midges (#20-32, morning). Try some terrestrials throughout the day. A lot of success mornings is being found below the surface on nymphs, wets and streamers. Try bottom bouncing caddis pupa Euro-style.

Housatonic River – Conditions for fishing should be very good again this weekend. Flows continue to hover around the typical levels for mid-July, currently 371 CFS at Falls Village and 636 CFS at Gaylordsville) and are just perfect for wading. Morning water temperatures are now in the low 70’s °F. With water temperatures rising, it’s a good time to go for Smallmouth, Pike, Fallfish, and Carp, they’re on fire hitting a variety of poppers and streamers.

Hatches/patterns include Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8- 10, Alder flies are very active during hot days), Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16- 18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 late afternoon & evening, just starting), Light Cahill (#12-14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Black Caddis, and Green caddis (#16-18, early morning & evening). Streamers fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies have been very productive.

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS Summer trout fishing is generally slow to fair, with the best reports from Crystal Lake (Ellington), Colebrook River Lake, West Hill Pond and Lake McDonough.

CONNECTICUT RIVER. The river is in great shape for fishing and boating. Flows are just enough above typical levels to ease boat access to those hard to get into places. STRIPED BASS are hanging out near the mouth (with schools of bunker) and fair action can be found from shore at the DEEP Old Lyme boardwalk or by launching a kayak from Great Island Launch in Old Lyme. Anglers are reporting solid catches of CATFISH (up to and over 10 pounds) throughout the river. We recommend using some really stinky bait. Set up just upstream of a deep “hole”. CARP are very active and providing quality action including some nice “mirror” and “fantail” have been caught between Middletown and Haddam. SMALLMOUTH BASS are putting on a good show in the northern part of the River. Try top water plugs and 4 inch Mr. Twisters, and Wacky Style salted worms in motor oil or chartreuse for these feisty jumpers. NORTHERN PIKE are patrolling the weedlines in search of shiners and other bait.

NOTES & NOTICES:

BRANFORD RIVER (boat launch). The Branford River state boat launch continues to be closed for renovations. Alternative nearby launch sites include the Guilford Town boat launch and the East River State boat launch, both in Guilford. Please check DEEP’s Boating Division website (www.ct.gov/deep/boating) on Tuesday, July 25 for an announcement of a final “open” date for this site.

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert). Hydrilla was recently found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse). See the Coventry Lake entry below for what river users should do to prevent spread of this invasive plant to other waterbodies.

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER (invasive species alert). Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard. Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high resolution) photos at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject line. Youth Fishing Passport Fishing Challenge Scorecard: Download the new scorecard for your Youth Fishing Passport Holder on the program web page at www.ct.gov/deep/yfp. Top anglers will receive a great prize pack of fishing gear.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription.

MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are around 70 0F.

SEE A TANGLED TURTLE? CALL THE HOTLINE: 1-860-572-5955 ext. 107. This is the time of year when leatherback, loggerhead, green, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles return to northern waters, with many sightings around Long Island Sound.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

STRIPED BASS fishing has been fairly good at night, and slowing down by day with warmer water temperatures arriving. You can find the larger striped bass in deeper water (20′-60′) at The Weather Buoy and in shallow water along Captains Island and Island Beach (formerly known as Little Captains Island off of Greenwich). Live-lining bunker has been the hottest magnet for these “Rockfish”, followed by fresh bunker and live eels. Smaller, sporty “schoolie” stripers are being caught at Long Beach and Short Beach in Stratford, Pleasure Beach Family Pier, Seaside Park, Sherwood Island State Park, Compo Beach, Calf Pasture Beach Pier, Stamford’s Cove Island and Todd’s Point in Greenwich. The Morningside area of Milford, Walnut Beach, Gulf Beach Pier and the Milford Audubon Society have been excellent locations for catching that trophy-sized striped bass. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Six Mile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Shore locations include…Connecticut River by Dock and Dine and the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier.

SUMMER FLOUNDER (fluke) fishing has been a little spotty once again with many shorts (in the 18″ range) being returned to waters so that they have a chance to grow and produce offspring. From shore, Bucktails with a Berkley Gulp tagged with a little bait has been producing some winners at South Benson Pier, Southport Harbor, Calf Pasture Breakwater and Pier and Todd’s Point near the Sailing School. Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay/River, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 3 fish per person. CT Bait & Tackleshop List

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is awesome. Black sea bass and scup (porgy) are still the two most popular fish to target this week in the Western Sound. BSB are just about everywhere and are still chowing down on high-low rigs tipped with clam, squid and sand worms. Although you don’t want to feed the ocean with all of your bait, chumming has been a smart tool. Also, diamond jigs and flashy spinner rigs in colors that glow or pink have done extremely well. This week’s home turf of black sea bass is Sunkin Island, Pennfield Reef, and the mouth of Blackrock Harbor. Another great spot this week is the Middleground in 30′-60′ of water, buoy 18, buoy 20 and BH Buoy.

SCUP (porgy) have been using the same haunts as black sea bass and also sharing the same interest in high-low rigs baited with clams and squid. Sunken Island, Pennfield Reef, mouth of Blackrock Harbor and Long Beach breakwater in Stratford have been their hangout. Scup anglers this week have also been reaching their limits at Gulf Beach breakwater, Walnut Beach, South Benson rocks (along the piers walkway) Saint Mary’s by the Sea, Pleasure Beach Family Pier, Sherwood Island State Park, Compo Beach breakwater, Calf Pasture Beach breakwater, Cummings and Cove Beaches in Stamford and Todd’s Point. Although the Greenwich Town Pier has been indefinitely closed for safety concerns, anglers have actually been catching porgy from the piers fishing from the parking lot. In fact scup are so bountiful this week, it might be easier to just list the place where you cannot find them – ON LAND! Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Mystic River Park, UCONN Avery Point, Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLUEFISH fishing continues to be good. Bluefish have been favoring coming to shore at night with striped bass. Pennfield Reef, Seaside Park, Calf Pasture Beach Pier, Saint Marys and South Benson are producing. Other shore locales this week are Stratford’s Short and Long Beach, Walnut Beach, Jennings Beach, Sandy Point, Silver Sands State Park, Southport Harbor and Five Mile River of the Rowayton section of Norwalk. By day Bluefish are favoring the harbors of Mamaroneck, Greenwich and Cos Cob. Blues are also scattered throughout Middleground, Greens Ledge Lighthouse and the Norwalk Islands including Sheffield, Cockenoe and Chimon. Because there are so many large schools of Bunker (Atlantic Menhaden) tantalizing the these bluefish with a shiny lure in the middle of a school of 5,000 is not going to be very effective. Try aiming your lure just outside the school, where some bluefish look for injured bait to stray from the pack. This method will increase the odds of catching a gator Blue noticing your lure and striking hard.

“Snappers” (juvenile bluefish) and “Harbor Blues” (16 – 22 inches) are also very common along many shore locations. These under sized bluefish provide great sport for shore anglers. Try the lower reaches of tidal rivers and estuaries…you will be glad you did as these predators push the bait up rivers.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing has been very good in shallow water (6 – 15 feet). Find your favorite rock pile or oyster bed and enjoy the “taug” fishing. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs…try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for tautog in shallow water as they begin spawning over shellfish beds. Other prime locations include: pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (5 to 30 ft).

BLUE CRAB are in the molting phase (sally crab) and becoming more active in the tidal creeks and rivers as the water warms up. There appears to be a lot of smaller crabs out there…a good sign for a great year of crabbing. Please remember it’s mating season for the crabs and release all egg-bearing females (sooks or lemon bellies). There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (8.0 inches spike to spike) along with some impressive sooks. Remember… all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs. Blue Crab Fact Sheet

NOTABLE CATCHES:

  • Tiger Shark 108” C&R Pauly Randazzo Jr.
  • Striped Bass 54” C&R Derek Williams
  • Striped Bass 43” 35 lb 7 oz Jennifer Zuppe
  • Scup 19” 3 lb 3 oz Jennifer Zuppe
  • Black Sea Bass 24.75” 4 lb 12 oz Albert Zuppe
  • Bluefish 41” 16 lb 4 oz Albert Zuppe
  • Bluefish 40.5” 17 lb 2 oz Jennifer Zuppe

Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report 7/13/2017

INLAND REPORT

LARGEMOUTH BASS. With some exceptions fishing has been good in many areas. Places to try include Highland Lake, Glasgo Pond, Shenipsit Lake, West Hill Pond, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Congamond Lakes, Winchester Lake, Lake Saltonstall, Lake Wononskopomuc, Bantam Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Beseck Lake, East Twin Lake, Babcock Pond, Wood Creek Pond, Rogers Lake, Pickerel Lake, Dog Pond, Red Cedar Lake, Bishop Pond, Lake McDonough, Candlewood Lake (fish are still acting “postspawn”, try Senkos near structure and dropshots around outsides of weedbeds), Silver Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Mudge Pond, Batterson Park Pond, Stillwater Pond, Amos Lake and Halls Pond. In lakes with some deeper water (including Ball Pond and Candlewood Lake), bass have been suspended around 15-20 feet, try swim baits here. In the southeast, bass have been on a “bug” kick, going after insects.

Tournament angler reports are from Gorton Pond (slow to good, 3.64 lb lunker), Lake of Isles (fair, but with a 5.70 lb lunker), Long Pond (slow, 4 lb lunker), Mansfield Hollow Reservoir (fair to good), Pachaug Pond (on the tough side, with only a 3.5 lb lunker), Bantam Lake (fair to good, 3.5 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (tough, but with 4.63 lb and 4.44 lb lunkers), and the CT River (slow to fair for one club, with a 3.4 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS fishing remains slow in many lakes and ponds, but there are some brighter spots. Places to try include Lake Lillinonah, Lake Zoar, Candlewood Lake (anglers are finding some action), Mashapaug Lake, Colebrook River Lake, and Lake McDonough. Fishing for river smallmouth is good to very good in the Housatonic River, also try other rivers such as the Naugatuck River, Shetucket River and Quinebaug River. Tournament angler reports are from are from Pachaug Pond (some 1- lb smallies in the bags), Bantam Lake (slow to fair), Lake Lillinonah (fair to good) and the CT River (Haddam to Middletown, some smallies caught, 2.24 lb lunker).

NORTHERN PIKE Only a few reports for pike this week. Weedlines early and late in the day typically hold pike. Places for pike include Bantam Lake. Lake Lillinonah, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Quaddick Lake (try up in Stump Pond), Hopeville Pond, the Connecticut River, the small impoundments along the upper Housatonic River (some catches reported from the Falls village area), and Winchester Lake.

WALLEYE Some catches reported but fishing has slowed, reports are from Squantz Pond (beginning to slow, but still some catches at night), Saugatuck Reservoir (few) and Lake Saltonstall. Other locations to try include Batterson Park Pond, Beach Pond, Cedar Lake, Gardner Lake, West Thompson Lake, Mount Tom Pond, and Mashapaug Lake.

PANFISH are providing excellent summer time action. A simple worm and bobber will work best. Suggested locations include: Tyler Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Amos Pond, Barber Pond, Baummer Pond, Black Rock Lake, Burr Pond, Dooley Pond, Halls Pond, Lake of Isles, Lower Fulton Park Pond and McGrath Park Pond. Check out and download the FREE- CARE “Let’s Go Fishing” Workbook available on the DEEP website at www.ct.gov/deep/care. Good reports for Black Crappie from Lake Lillinonah. White Perch are there for the taking in places like Lake Lillinonah and Shenipsit Lake.

KOKANEE has been a bit spotty, with good days and slow days at both East Twin Lake (mostly 12 inch fish with some 14 inchers) and West Hill Pond. Try Beads, Mooselook Wobblers, DB Smelt, and Flash King lures (blue & silver); or fishing corn over lights at night.

TROUT

RIVERS & STREAMS – Conditions for the weekend should be fairly good. The forecast includes more rain and some cool weather for Friday, followed by pleasant weather (including moderate temperatures and humidity) for the weekend (then some heat comes back next week). Water temperatures are generally moderate, flows are more than adequate (at or above typical early July levels in most areas, especially in eastern CT – see stream flow graphic on page 5). With some more rain, possibly heavy, in the forecast for tonight (Thursday) and Friday, flows, however, be high in some areas to start the weekend. Anglers should keep smaller streams and tributaries in mind as they’ll drop quickest (stream flows for a number of areas can be found on the USGS website at http://waterdata.usgs.gov/ct/nwis/rt).

Farmington River – Fishing has been very good and should continue to be very good for the weekend. Plenty of the large Brown Trout stocked for the Fourth are still there, West Branch flows are clear, moderate and quite fishable (currently 272 CFS at Riverton, with the Still River adding 46 CFS) and water temperatures continue to range from the low 50’s °F below the dam to the mid 60’s °F by Collinsville. Depending on further rainfall amounts before the weekend, flows below the Still river may however increase some.

Rock Snot is “blooming”. Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard.

Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River. Hatches/patterns Hatches/patterns include Isonychia (#10-12, some now through and up above the year-round C & R area), Tan Caddis (#16-18, good all day), Light Cahill (#10-14), March Brown nymphs (#10-12), Blue Wing Olives (#18-20, D. cornuta and D. cornutella), cloudy days, mid-late afternoon, Caddis (tan #14-18, all day; green #16-18) and Midges (#20-32). Hatches have been best in the evening. Streamers are also good at times (early and late, or when cloudy). Anglers should remember to also look in the fast water for some fish.

Housatonic River – Conditions for fishing should be very good again this weekend. Flows are near typical levels for July, currently 434 CFS at Falls Village and 704 CFS at Gaylordsville) and perfect for wading. Depending on rainfall in the Berkshires flow may become somewhat higher for the weekend. Morning water temperatures remain favorable for trout and are in the upper 60’s to low 70’s °F. Smallmouth are on fire hitting a variety of poppers and streamers.

Hatches/patterns include Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8- 10, Alder flies are very active during hot days), Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16- 18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 late afternoon & evening, just starting), Light Cahill (#12-14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Black Caddis, and Green caddis (#16-18, early morning & evening). Streamers fishing and nymphing with big stoneflies have been very productive.

TROUT

LAKES & PONDS – Trout fishing continues in the doldrums, with reports from Saugatuck Reservoir (slow), Lake McDonough, West Hill Pond, Crystal Lake, and East Twin Lake (a few being trolled up).

CONNECTICUT RIVER The river has dropped significantly and the turbidity and floating “debris” have dropped a bit. Schoolie STRIPED BASS have thinned out. Most action, especially for keepers will be back towards the sound. The mouth continues to have fair action from shore at the DEEP Old Lyme boardwalk. Anglers in the Middletown area have been catching CATFISH in the holes. CARP including some nice “mirror” and “fantail” have been caught between Middletown and Haddam. SMALLMOUTH BASS are putting on a good show in the northern part of the River. Try top water plugs and 4”, Mr. Twisters, Wacky Style salted worms in motor oil or chartreuse for these feisty jumpers. BOWFIN are starting to be more aggressive towards lures and bait resulting in increased catches. The Bowfin (Amia calva – cover photo) has an elongate body, fairly hard (bony plates) head, and long fins on the dorsal and ventral surface. They have some similarity to the infamous “snakehead”. A change in the fishing regulations now allows anglers to fish for, andharvest, bowfin if they desire. There are no size limits, daily limits, and the season is open year round.

NOTES & NOTICES:

CONNECTICUT RIVER (invasive species alert). Hydrilla was recently found in the main stem Connecticut River in Glastonbury (near Glastonbury’s Riverfront Park & Boathouse). See the Coventry Lake entry below for what river users should do to prevent spread of this invasive plant to other waterbodies.

COVENTRY LAKE (invasive species alert). Hydrilla, a very highly invasive aquatic plant, has been found growing in Coventry Lake. All lake users should take extra care to check and clean their boats (including canoes, kayaks and rowing sculls), trailers, and fishing equipment before leaving the boat launch, or leaving the lakeshore.

WEST BRANCH FARMINGTON RIVER (invasive species alert). Cymbella janischii is a close relative of Didymo and has been introduced to the West Branch Farmington River (first noticed in 2011). C. janischii is native to the Pacific Northwest and not naturally found on the Eastern seaboard. Currently this type of “Rock Snot” is very abundant and should continue to grow through July. The primary area of the river is from New Hartford upstream to Riverton. Note: Didymo is still present primarily in the West Branch above the Still River in Riverton. To help prevent the spread to other rivers and streams, all anglers should take extra care to clean and dry waders that have been in contact with rock snot. We recommend having a pair just for use only in the Farmington River.

PHOTO CONTEST: Do you have the next Angler’s Guide cover shot? Email us your high quality (high resolution) photos at Deep.inland.fisheries@ct.gov and include photo contest in the subject line. Youth Fishing Passport Fishing Challenge Scorecard: Download the new scorecard for your Youth Fishing Passport Holder on the program web page at www.ct.gov/deep/yfp. Top anglers will receive a great prize pack of fishing gear.

CT FISHIN’ TIPS is our monthly e-newletter dedicated to providing information, tips and pointers about fishing in Connecticut. Get CT Fishin’ Tips delivered automatically to your in box by subscribing at www.ct.gov/deep/newslettersubscription


MARINE FISHING REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the mid to high 60’s 0F.

IMPORTANT NOTE to ANGLERS:

there are many reports of leaping sturgeon in the lower CT River (Essex to Old Saybrook). A common spring behavior for these endangered fish species (Atlantic and shortnose)…as they attempt to gulp air for their primitive swim bladder. Anglers are incidentally snagging or catching these sturgeon while bottom fishing. Please release all sturgeon without avoidable injury as their populations are slowly recovering and are at VERY low levels. They are a protected species.

Connecticut State Boundary Line in Long Island Sound. Anglers please note: Though Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or All Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

LICENSE RECIPROCITY & CT RESIDENTS: Anglers please note: Although Connecticut has reciprocity with neighboring states (New York, Rhode Island, Maine and Massachusetts), residents of Connecticut are required to have a CT Resident Marine Waters or all-Waters Sport Fishing License to fish in the Marine District.

STRIPED BASS fishing will improve on the back side of the “Buck” full moon. Striped Bass again have been staying in deeper water by day and coming into shore at night. They have been preferring fresh bunker and live-lining eels at the Weather Buoy, Calf Pasture Beach Pier, BH Buoy, the Middleground, Buoy 18 and 20, Norwalk Islands, Sunken Island, Seaside Park and Hickory Bluff Bridge in the Rowayton Section of Norwalk as well as Greens Ledge Lighthouse. These bass have been gulping up FRESH bunker and live eels. Six inch Tsunamis, Talking Poppers and Heddon Superspooks have also been outstanding performers for striped bass. The Morningside area of Milford, Walnut Beach, Gulf Beach Pier and the Milford Audubon Society have been excellent locations for catching that trophy-sized striped bass. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Six Mile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Shore locations include…Connecticut River by Dock and Dine and the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier.

SUMMER FLOUNDER (fluke) fishing has been inconsistent from Stamford to Greenwich but a little stronger from New Haven to Darien. By boat, keepers have been found this week in 40′-50′ of water. The Middleground has been very good. Also, Buoys 18 & 20 are home this week to some very large Fluke. From shore, Bucktails with a Berkley Gulp tagged with a little bait has been producing some winners at South Benson Pier, Southport Harbor, Calf Pasture Breakwater and Pier and Todd’s Point near the Sailing School. Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay/River, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Minimum size is 19 inches and the daily creel limit is 3 fish per person. Time to get the boat, and fishing gear ready for some phenomenal early season fluke fishing. CT Bait & Tackleshop List

BLACK SEA BASS fishing is tremendous. Black Sea Bass fishing has been awesome this week at the Norwalk Islands, Sunken Island, Buoy 18, Buoy 20 and the Weather Buoy, also the Middleground in 35′- 50′ of water has been phenomenal especially while enticing them with Squid, Clams and Spearing on a High-Low rig. It has not been unusual this week to reel in a 19″ or 23″ Black Sea Bass. Don’t like using bait? – try a small diamond jig with a bucktail. Black Sea Bass typically prefer FRESH clams. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows…15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet) on a jig along with squid and a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

SCUP (porgy) fishing is on fire in the western Sound; especially along the flats and from the shores of; Pleasure Beach, Saint Marys by the Sea, Sherwood Island State Park, Compo Beach, Todd’s Point, the Wall in Stratford and also Calf Pasture Pier. At Seaside Park they are practically jumping straight into your cooler. Sand worms and Clams on a high-low rig are working best. High-low rigs with 2 different baits double your chances at bringing home dinner. Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Mystic River Park, UCONN Avery Point, Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these hard fighting and excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

WEAKFISH fishing continues to be very good in the central and western Sound. Fish range from 18-28 inches. Central and western Sound catches are improving daily as the population rebounds. Good fishing in Niantic, New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals. Weakfish prefer sand worms and clams at low light and dusk. One of the best eating saltwater fish you will ever catch.

BLUEFISH fishing continues to be good for harbor blues. Although the Bluefish schools have been spotty and more localized, there are sufficient amounts of schools to have an excellent day of fishing at Middleground, Calf Pasture Beach Pier and Seaside Park. Just look for the Seagulls. Most of the local Long Island Sound reefs have many harbor-sized blues cruising around them. Bluefish schools have been scattered, sometimes mixed in with striped bass during the day in deeper water, sometimes arriving inshore during daylight hours. These “shark wannabes” will eat just about anything and they are real fun to catch.

“Snappers” (juvenile bluefish) and “Harbor Blues” (16 – 22 inches) are also very common along many shore locations. These under sized bluefish provide great sport for shore anglers. Try the lower reaches of tidal rivers and estuaries…you will be glad you did as these predators push the bait up rivers.

STRIPED SEAROBIN fishing is awesome in LIS. These beautiful and strange looking fish are now very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. Searobin are in abundance almost everywhere, and more and more anglers are realizing the somewhat tedious task of filleting them is well worth it – they are quite tasty. They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them…be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover. Searobins are very good eating.

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG) fishing season is open in Connecticut waters. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs…try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for tautog in shallow water as they begin spawning over shellfish beds. Other prime locations include: pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (5 to 30 ft).

BLUE CRAB are in the molting phase (sally crab) and becoming more active in the tidal creeks and rivers as the water warms up. There appears to be a lot of smaller crabs out there…a good sign for a great year of crabbing. Please remember it’s mating season for the crabs and release all egg-bearing females (sooks or lemon bellies). There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (8.0 inches spike to spike) along with some impressive sooks. Remember… all egg bearing females must be released without avoidable injury. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs. Blue Crab Fact Sheet

NOTABLE CATCHES:

  • Porgy 16” C&R Evan Kamoen
  • Black Sea Bass 22” C&R Evan Kamoen

Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report #41

INLAND REPORT

TROUT- RIVERS & STREAMS  

Rivers are at or near record low levels statewide. Fish should be concentrating in pockets of deeper water and deep runs (more typical of late summer). Good catches of Rainbow Trout reported in the Naugatuck, Natchaug, and Salmon rivers. Just about all types of gear are working well. Mealworms, night crawlers, live minnows, small castmasters and phoebe goldfish, and many dryflies and nymphs.

Farmington River

Fishing continues to be excellent with the “survivor browns” providing a thrill to those who connect (16-20 inches). There are also plenty of rainbow and stocked browns ready to please. West Branch flows are clear and moderate (currently 247 cfs at Riverton, with the Still River adding 18 cfs). Water temperatures are in the low 60’s°F (much colder above the Still River confluence in Riverton).

Hatches/patterns

include: Isonychia (#12-14) working their way upstream, Vitreus [a.k.a. pale evening dun] (#16-18, from 5:00pm to dark), Tan Caddis (#16-18, good all day), Sulfurs, (Invaria #16-18, hatches mid-day and Dorothea #16-18). Successful patterns include: Light Cahill (#10-14), March Brown nymphs (#10-12), Gray Fox (#14, afternoon), Blue Wing Olives (#18-24, mid-late afternoon), Caddis (tan #14-18, all day; green #22-26, evening), Midges (#20-32), Blue Quill (#16-18) and Pale Evening Duns (Epeorus vitreus #16-18, afternoon and early evenings) and the ole reliable red and black ant.

Housatonic River

Water temperatures will be rising for the foreseeable future (low flow and warm sunny days). As such many tout will be seeking out the tributaries and thermal refuges while water temps are out of their comfort zone. These areas are critical to their survival when going gets rough. Water clarity is clear. Water temperatures are currently in the high 60’s with flows at a very low 266 cfs at Falls Village and 342 cfs at Gaylordsville.

Hatches/patterns

Major insect hatches are here and are providing excellent fly fishing, but mostly in the late evening for trout. Try poppers for Smallmouth Bass during the day, they will provide non-stop action and help hone your skills.

Other flies include: Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8-10) is underway (should last up to 4 weeks) and will produce some great fishing. Alder flies are very active during hot days. Additional bugs include the Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 late afternoon & evening, just starting), Light Cahill (#12-14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Black Caddis, Green caddis (#16-18, early morning & evening) are on the water.

Anglers are reminded that the thermal refuge areas on the Housatonic, Naugatuck and Shetucket Rivers are now closed to fishing (as of June 15). These areas will reopen on September 15. There is no fishing within 100 feet of signs indicating such closure at or near the mouths of tributaries to these rivers. Additionally, a thermal refuge has been established on the Salmon River in East Haddam, located around a spring entering the Salmon River approximately 220 feet south of the unused paved boat launch at the state-owned property formerly known as the Sunrise Resort off of Route 151. The refuge includes all water within 100 feet from the end of the pipe as posted. The Salmon River refuge will be closed to fishing and access through September 15.

TROUT-LAKES & PONDS

There are big trout around or anglers to catch. Some lakes to try include: East Twin Lake, Mashapaug Lake (riggers @ 20-25’), Colebrook Reservoir (riggers @ 25’+, Mooselook silver/blue) , Lake McDonough (7-8 colors), Valley Falls Park Pond, West Hill Pond, Highland Lake (4 colors), Beach Pond (early @ 20-25’), Long Pond (Kobra 14), Crystal Lake (Ellington; 7-8 colors, troll @ 2mph), Mohawk Pond, Beach Pond, Black Pond (Woodstock) & Bigelow Pond.

LARGEMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported as good to very good. Places to try include Mashapaug Lake, Colebrook Reservoir, Congamond Lakes, Lake Saltonstall, Lake McDonough, Highland Lake, Winchester Lake, Bantam Lake, Candlewood Lake, Lake Wononskopomuc, Batterson Park Pond, Black Pond (Meriden), Lake Lillinonah, Breakneck Pond (great hike in location), Griggs Pond, Lake Waramaug, West Hill Pond, Park Pond, Crystal Lake (Ellington), Gardner Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Stillwater Pond, Winchester Lake, Squantz Pond, Maltby Lake 2 & 3, Wood Creek Pond, Pachaug Pond, Ball Pond, Quonnipaug Lake, Silver Lake (Meriden) and Halls Pond.

Tournament angler are from Amos Lake (good for largemouth, 4.82 lb & 3.56 lb lunkers), Beach Pond (fair fishing, but mostly post-spawn fish and thin, caught between 8 and 18 feet, 5.96 lb lunker), Gardner Lake (fair to good fishing, 4.38 lb lunker), Pacahug Pond (slow to fair, anglers had to work for their fish, but some nice fish weighed-in, 5.1 lb, 4.39 lb, 4.38 lb, 4.3 lb & 4.1lb lunkers), Pattagansett Lake (fair to good evening & night, 3.2 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair fishing, 3.87 lb & 3.58 lb lunker), Highland Lake (fair to good fishing, “lots of keepers caught”, 5.41 lb lunker), and Lake Lillinonah (fair for largemouth, 4.43 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported as fair (hopefully improving). Try out at Mashapaug Lake, Lake McDonough, Highland Lake, Bantam Lake, Candlewood Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Naugatuck River, and the Housatonic River.

Tournament angler reports are from Beach Pond (very hard to find smallmouth), Gardner Lake (not many), Pachaug Pond (the usual several smallies caught during the tournament), Candlewood Lake (fair action, 4.13 lb & 3.47 lb lunkers), and Lake Lillinonah (fair for smallmouth, 3.41 lb lunker).

NORTHERN PIKE

fishing is reported to be good when using large live golden shiners. Places to try for “Northerns” this weekend include Lake Lillinonah, Winchester Lake, Bantam Lake, and Connecticut River Coves

KOKANEE

are being caught at West Hill Pond (3 colors). Beads, Mooselook Wobblers, DB Smelt, Flash King lures (blue & silver) are producing. Try fishing corn over lights at nights.

WALLEYE

are being reported from Batterson Park Pond, Squantz Pond, and Beach Pond.

PANFISH

are providing excellent summer time action. Any local pond open to fishing near you will give you some action. The kids love this non-stop action and it will keep them occupied for hours. Any type of inexpensive fishing pole or drop line is all you need to catch these fish. Suggested locations include: Tyler Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Amos Pond, Barber Pond, Baummer Pond, Black Rock Lake, Burr Pond, Dooley Pond, Halls Pond, Lake of Isles, Lower Fulton Park Pond and McGrath Park Pond.

CATFISH

are providing decent action on live shiners, chicken livers, and chunk bait from the Connecticut River Hartford to Haddam, Lower Bolton Lake and Batterson Park Pond.

CONNECTICUT RIVER

Top water catches of STRIPED BASS in the lower river continue on live bunker or live eels. Anglers in the Middletown area have been catching CATFISH in the holes. CARP including some nice “mirror” and “fantail” have been caught between Middletown and Haddam. SMALLMOUTH BASS are putting on a good show in the northern part of the River. Try top water plugs and 4”, Mr. Twisters, Wacky Style salted worms in motor oil or chartreuse for these feisty jumpers. BOWFIN are starting to be more aggressive towards lures and bait resulting in increased catch and calls to the Inland Fisheries Division. The Bowfin (Amia calva) has ane elongate body, fairly hard (bony plates) head, and long fins on the dorsal and ventral surface. They have some similarity to the infamous “snakehead”. A change in the fishing regulations now allows anglers to harvest bowfin (a very tasty fish) if they desire. There are no size limits, daily limits, and the season is open year round.


MARINE REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the mid 60’s F.

STRIPED BASS

fishing remains excellent. Shore anglers are really scoring on the big bass in the lower tidal rivers where all the bait has been lately. Recently, there was another large bass, 45 pound striped bass caught from shore in Old Lyme (late evening). The big fish keep on rolling in to feed on the abundant bait populations. Western sound (Norwalk to Stratford) catches are improving daily for anglers using chunk bait during the evening. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. There is plenty of bunker throughout LIS including the tidal rivers to hold fish. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

STRIPED BASS ANGLERS FISHING IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS are advised that the state of Rhode Island has adopted the following regulations pertaining to striped bass. These regulations apply to all Rhode Island state lands and waters including the waters around Block Island: “Any person recreationally harvesting a striped bass thirty-four (34) inches or larger shall at the time of harvest have the right pectoral fin removed at a point as close to the body of the fish as possible.”

SUMMER FLOUNDER

fishing is fair for “keepers” in Long Island Sound. The area north of Montauk Point (40-80 feet) and the southside of Block Island is producing good numbers of fish…fluke up to 11.25 pounds this week. Mid to western LIS anglers are still reporting good numbers of sub-legal sized fish and a few keepers mixed in, up to 6 pounds. (Norwalk/Stratford/New Haven/Woodmont area). Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”- 4” Gulp Mullet in chartreuse, white or pink color. Fresh squid and or silversides (spearing) have also been producing. Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person.

STRIPED SEAROBIN

fishing is good in LIS for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. These beautiful and strange looking fish are now very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With many fish measuring over 20 inches, 3 pounds and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them…be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover.

WEAKFISH

fishing continues to keep on getting better with good numbers of 24-28 inch size fish being caught in the east. Central and western sound catches are improving as the population rebounds from low abundance. Good fishing in Niantic, New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals. One of the best eating saltwater fish you will ever catch.

SCUP

fishing is very good in Long Island Sound. Like sea bass…they are everywhere. Hook up with your local party/charter boat to get into some of the best fishing ever! These scup are very large and delicious to eat! Seriously, try fishing for some “reef slammers” and enjoy some great fishing…there are lots of scup around for all. Porgies measuring 13-18 inches (“hubcap size”) have been caught! Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett and Fort Trumbull State Park.

BLACK SEA BASS

fishing is phenomenal everywhere in Long Island Sound. Fishing over any deep water structure (gnarly bottom preferred) in 30 to 110 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass along with fluke and sea robins. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows…15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet), on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”. Clams and sandworms also work well. New York waters are open now.

BLUEFISH

fishing is starting to be very good with more and more bluefish arriving from the Montauk area, after feeding on scup and squid. The Race, Plum Gut, many of the major rocky reefs, rips, and shoal areas in LIS will harbor bluefish. Speed squiding diamond jigs, trolling parachute jigs or umbrella rigs, and using fresh bunker or hickory shad chunks on three-way bottom rigs have all been effective. Other bluefish spots include the Sluiceway, Gardiners Bay, Peconic Bays, and the north shore of Long Island along with the Stratford Shoal area. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best FISHING you will ever experience. Yes, the “Snappers” (juvenile bluefish) have arrived! Harbor Blues (15 – 24 inches) are also very common in lower estuaries.

HICKORY SHAD

fishing is ok in the Black Hall River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and in Clinton Harbor. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass. They move up and down the river systems with the tide and are sometimes difficult to locate for the shore angler. Flood or the beginning of the Ebb tide is typically the best and lures of choice are a willow leaf (silver or copper), Kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white, red or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers”. Its great shore fishing and you get to meet a lot of anglers and trade fishing stories (“secrets”).

BLACKFISH (TAUTOG)

fishing season opens July 1 in Connecticut waters. The daily creel limit is 2 fish per person and the minimum size is 16 inches. Tautog love eating crabs…try green, Asian and hermit crabs for bait. Look for tautogs over shellfish beds, pilings with mussel beds and rock (reef) piles (6 to 30 feet).

WHITE PERCH

fishing remains good. Perch are found in estuaries, tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River (Stanton Weir Pit/Point), Mystic River, upper Thames River and Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and or a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success.

BLUE CRAB

are in the molting phase (sally crab) and becoming more active in the tidal creeks and rivers. With a little time…there should be beaucoup blue crabs of legal size. Also, please remember it’s mating season for the crabs and release all egg-bearing females (sooks or lemon bellies). There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (8.25 inches spike to spike) along with some impressive sooks. Remember…all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.


NOTABLE CATCHES
Species Length (in.) Weight (lbs) Name
Porgy 19.5 4lbs Paul Chaplinsky
Striped Bass 27.5 37lbs 9oz Jessica Katinas

Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report #40

INLAND REPORT

TROUT- RIVERS & STREAMS  

– Rivers are at or near record low levels statewide. Fish should be concentrating in pockets of deeper water and deep runs (more typical of late summer). This season’s weather conditions have created excellent river/stream fishing conditions and provided anglers with some superb fishing. Just about all types of gear are working well. Mealworms, night crawlers, live minnows, small castmasters and phoebe goldfish, and many dryflies and nymphs.

Farmington River

Fishing continues to be very good to excellent with the beautiful “survivor browns” providing a thrill (16-20 inches). West Branch flows are clear and moderate (currently 265 cfs at Riverton, with the Still River adding just 17 cfs). Water temperatures are in the low 60’s°F.

Hatches/patterns

include: Isonychia (#12-14), Vitreus [a.k.a. pale evening dun] (#16-18, from 5:00pm to dark), Tan Caddis (#16-18, good all day), Sulfurs, (Invaria #16-18, hatches mid-day and Dorothea #16-18). The fish show a preference for the males (#18). Successful patterns include: Light Cahill (#10-14), March Brown nymphs (#10-12), Gray Fox (#14, afternoon), Blue Wing Olives (#18-24, mid-late afternoon), Caddis (tan #14-18, all day; green #22-26, evening), Midges (#20-32), Blue Quill (#16-18) and Pale Evening Duns (Epeorus vitreus #16-18, afternoon and early evenings).

Housatonic River

Fishing continues to be very good to excellent and will remain so through the weekend. Water clarity is fairly clear. Water temperatures are currently in the high 60’s with 371 cfs at Falls Village and 447 cfs at Gaylordsville.

Hatches/patterns

Major insect hatches are here and are providing excellent fly fishing. Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8-10) is underway (should last up to 4 weeks) and will produce some great fishing. Alder flies are very active during hot days. Additional bugs include the Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 late afternoon & evening, just starting), Light Cahill (#12-14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Black Caddis, Green caddis (#16-18, early morning & evening) are on the water. Midges and early golden stoneflies (#6-10) are also being seen at the mouths of tributaries.

Anglers are reminded that the thermal refuge areas on the Housatonic, Naugatuck and Shetucket Rivers are now closed to fishing (as of June 15). These areas will reopen on September 15. There is no fishing within 100 feet of signs indicating such closure at or near the mouths of tributaries to these rivers.

TROUT-LAKES & PONDS

– There are big trout around for anglers to catch. Some lakes to try include: East Twin Lake, Mashapaug Lake (riggers @ 20-25’), Colebrook Reservoir (riggers @ 25’+, Mooselook silver/blue) , Lake McDonough (7-8 colors), Valley Falls Park Pond, West Hill Pond, Highland Lake (4 colors), Beach Pond (early @ 20-25’), Long Pond (Kobra 14), Crystal Lake (Ellington; 7-8 colors, troll @ 2mph), Mohawk Pond, Beach Pond, Black Pond (Woodstock) & Bigelow Pond.

LARGEMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported as good to very good. Places to try include Mashapaug Lake, Colebrook Reservoir, Congamond Lakes, Lake Saltonstall, Lake McDonough, Highland Lake, Winchester Lake, Bantam Lake, Candlewood Lake, Lake Wononskopomuc, Batterson Park Pond, Black Pond (Meriden), Lake Lillinonah, Breakneck Pond (great hike in location), Griggs Pond, Lake Waramaug, West Hill Pond, Park Pond, Crystal Lake (Ellington), Gardner Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Still Water Pond, Winchester Lake, Squantz Pond, Maltby Lake 2 & 3, Wood Creek Pond, Pachaug Pond, Ball Pond, Quonnipaug Lake, Silver Lake (Meriden) and Halls Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Aspinook Pond (slow-fair fishing, “high-pressure weather wise”, 2.31 lb lunker for club, fair to good with a 4.7 lb lunker for another tourny), Gorton Pond (good, 4.72 lb lunker, fish average nearly 2 lbs apiece), Lake of Isles (fair-good, 3.99 lb lunker), Long Pond (tough, a 4.77 lb lunker buth few other fish), Mansfield Hollow Reservoir (fair action, 3.12 lb, 3.11 lb & 3.07 lb lunkers), Pickerel Lake (good fishing, but nothing of any size, and a 1.5 lb lunker), Rogers Lake (very good fishing, “…caught fish offand-on most of the day…”, 4.61 lb & 4.23 lb lunkers plus several more 3 lb plus fish), Bantam Lake (fair action, 3.99 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair-good, 4.66 lb, 3.1 lb lunkers), and Wononskopomuc Lake (good, 4.3 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported reported as fair (hopefully improving). Try out at Mashapaug Lake, Lake McDonough, Highland Lake, Bantam Lake, Candlewood Lake, Lake Lillinonah, Naugatuck River, Housatonic River and Gardner Lake.

Tournament angler reports are from Bantam Lake (fair fishing for those targeting smallies,) and Candlewood Lake (fair for smallmouth, 3.66 lb lunker).

NORTHERN PIKE

fishing is reported to be good in Winchester Lake, Bantam Lake (fish to 30”), Upper Housatonic River, and Connecticut River Coves.

KOKANEE

are being caught at East Twin Lake (18’+) and West Hill Pond (3 colors). Beads, Mooselook Wobblers, DB Smelt, Flash King lures (blue & silver) are producing. Try fishing corn over lights at nights.

WALLEYE

are being reported from Batterson Park Pond, Squantz Pond and Lake Saltonstall.

PANFISH

are providing excellent summer time action. Any local pond open to fishing near you will give you some action. The kids love this non-stop action and it will keep them occupied for hours. Any type of inexpensive fishing pole or drop line is all you need to catch these fish. Suggested locations include: Tyler Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Amos Pond, Barber Pond, Baummer Pond, Black Rock Lake, Burr Pond, Dooley Pond, Halls Pond, Lake of Isles, Lower Fulton Park Pond and McGrath Park Pond.

CATFISH

are providing solid action on live shiners, chicken livers, and chunk bait from community fishing waters, Connecticut River Hartford to Haddam, and Lower Bolton Lake and Batterson Park Pond.

CONNECTICUT RIVER

Top water catches of STRIPED BASS in the lower river continue with some fish good size coming to net. Multiple catches are occurring for some exciting catches. Anglers in the Middletown area have been catching CATFISH in the holes. CARP including some nice “mirror” and “fantail” have been caught between Middletown and Haddam. SMALLMOUTH BASS are putting on a good show in the northern part of the River. Try top water plugs and 4”, Mr. Twisters, Wacky Style salted worms in motor oil or chartreuse for these feisty jumpers. BOWFIN are starting to be more aggressive towards lures and bait resulting in increased catch and calls to the Inland Fisheries Division. The Bowfin (Amia calva) has ane elongate body, fairly hard (bony plates) head, and long fins on the dorsal and ventral surface. They have some similarity to the infamous “snakehead”. A change in the fishing regulations now allows anglers to harvest bowfin (a very tasty fish) if they desire. There are no size limits, daily limits, and the season is open year round.


MARINE REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) remain in the 60’s F.

STRIPED BASS

fishing remains excellent. The backside of the full moon has provided phenomenal striped bass fishing. Recently there was a 51 pound striped bass caught from shore in Old Lyme. The big fish keep on rolling in to feed on the abundant bait populations. It’s also impressive to see how many anglers are catching and releasing so many of these trophy striped bass. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. There is plenty of bunker throughout LIS including the tidal rivers to hold fish. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef. Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier.

STRIPED BASS ANGLERS FISHING IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS are advised that the state of Rhode Island has adopted the following regulations pertaining to striped bass. These regulations apply to all Rhode Island state lands and waters including the waters around Block Island: “Any person recreationally harvesting a striped bass thirty-four (34) inches or larger shall at the time of harvest have the right pectoral fin removed at a point as close to the body of the fish as possible.”

SUMMER FLOUNDER

fishing is hit or miss for “keepers” in Long Island Sound. The area north of Montauk (40-60 feet) is producing good numbers of fish…fluke up to 13 pounds this week. Mid to western LIS anglers are still reporting good numbers of sub-legal sized fish and a few keepers mixed in, up to 5 pounds. (Norwalk/Stratford/New Haven/Woodmont area). Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”- 4” Gulp Mullet in chartreuse, white or pink color. Fresh squid and or silversides (spearing) have also been producing. Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person.

STRIPED SEAROBIN

fishing is good in LIS for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. These beautiful and strange looking fish are now very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With fish measuring over 23 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them…be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover.

WEAKFISH

fishing continues to keep on plugging along with some very nice fish reported in the central and western sound. Good fishing in New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals. One of the best eating saltwater fish you will ever catch.

SCUP

fishing is very good in Long Island Sound. It is much better on the southeast corner of Montauk in approximately 30 feet of water. There are huge schools of scup in relatively shallow water. Hook up with your local party/charter boat to get into some of the best fishing ever! These scup are very large and delicious to eat! Seriously, try fishing for some “reef slammers” and enjoy some great fishing…there are lots of scup around for all. Porgies measuring 13-18 inches (“hubcap size”) have been caught! Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park.

BLACK SEA BASS

fishing continues to keep on getting better, showing no signs of slowing down. Fishing over any deep water structure (gnarly bottom preferred) in 30 to 75 ft around slack tide will produce some trophysized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass along with fluke and sea robins. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows: 15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet), on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

BLUEFISH

fishing is improving with more and more bluefish arriving from the Montauk area, after feeding on scup and squid. The Race, Plum Gut, many of the major rocky reefs, rips, and shoal areas in LIS will harbor bluefish. Speed squidding diamond jigs, trolling parachute jigs or umbrella rigs, and using fresh bunker or hickory shad chunks on three-way bottom rigs have all been effective. Other bluefish spots include the Sluiceway, Gardiners Bay, Peconic Bays, and the north shore of Long Island along with the Stratford Shoal area. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best FISHING you will ever experience. These “Alligator Blues” are one of the hardest fighting fish you will ever reel in. Snappers (juvenile bluefish) have not arrived yet!

HICKORY SHAD

fishing is very good in the Black Hall River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and in Clinton Harbor. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass. They move up and down the river systems with the tide. Flood or the beginning of the Ebb tide is typically the best and lures of choice are a willow leaf (silver or copper), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white, red or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers”. It’s great shore fishing and you get to meet a lot of anglers and trade fishing stories (“secrets”)

BLUE CRAB

are becoming active in the tidal creeks and rivers. However, fishing is really improving for keepers (7.5 inches). Expect a very good year following a relatively warm winter and good survival of juvenile crabs. There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (7 inches spike to spike). Remember…all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.


NOTABLE CATCHES
Species Length (in.) Weight (lbs) Name
Summer Flounder 25 6lbs 3oz Steven Kamm
Summer Flounder 27 7lbs 2oz Max Kamm
Summer Flounder 26.5 7lbs 2oz Charles Fogarty
Summer Flounder 26.5 7lbs 6oz Laurie Macha
Porgy 18 2lbs 10oz Michael Rozanski
Striped Bass 51 C&R Juan M.

Courtesy of CTDEEP

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report #39

INLAND REPORT

TROUT- RIVERS & STREAMS  

– Conditions should be fairly good for the weekend as stream flow remain at or below normal levels (see stream flow graphic on page 3). Cool air temperatures, especially at night are keeping the trout spread throughout our rivers and streams. Just about every method is putting fish in the net, with good action being found on lures, flies, worms & corn/mealworm combinations. It’s approaching “Major Hatch Time” with just about every type of pattern working at one time or another (hatch times fluctuate with the water temperatures). Some good reports last week from the West Branch Farmington River, Housatonic River, Pequabuck River, Bigelow Brook, Blackledge River, Coginchaug River, Hop River, Jeremy River Roaring Brook (Glastonbury), Blackberry River, Mianus River, Hammonasset River, East Aspetuck River, Shetucket River, Leadmine Brook, Pequonnock River, Hockanum River, Tankerhoosen River and the Salmon River TMA.

Farmington River

Fishing has been very good to excellent, and conditions should be good for the weekend. West Branch flows are clear and moderate (currently 272 cfs at Riverton, with the Still River adding a meager 33 cfs). Water temperatures are in the low 60’s°F

Hatches/patterns

include Vitreus [a.k.a. pale evening dun] #16, from 5:00pm to dark, Tan Caddis (#18-22) good all day, Sulfurs, (Invaria #16 hatches mid-day and Dorothea #16-18), Light Cahill (#12-18), March Brown nymphs (#10-12, during the day), Gray Fox (#14, afternoon), Blue Quills (#16-18), Blue Wing Olives (#18-24, mid-late afternoon), Caddis (tan #18-22, all day; green #22-26, evening), Midges (#20-32) and Pale Evening Duns (Epeorus vitreus #14-16, afternoon & early evenings). March Brown, Sulphur and Rusty Spinners are falling in the evenings. Look for the Isonyichia to start showing up very soon.

Housatonic River

Fishing was good last week and should remain constant for the foreseeable future. Flows are currently 456 cfs at Falls Village and 686 cfs at Gaylordsville). Morning water temperatures are currentlyaround-60°F.

Hatches/patterns

Major insect hatches are here and are providing excellent fly fishing. Alder/Zebra Caddis (#8-10) should be beginning with any sudden warm up (should last up to 4 weeks) and will produce some great fishing. Alder flies are very active during hot days. Additional bugs include the Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Isonychia (#10-12 late afternoon & evening, just starting), Light Cahill (#12-14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Black Caddis, Green caddis (#16-18, early morning & evening) are on the water. Midges and early golden stoneflies (#6-10) are also being seen at the mouths of tributaries.

Anglers are reminded that the thermal refuge areas on the Housatonic, Naugatuck and Shetucket Rivers are now closed to fishing (as of June 15). These areas will reopen on September 15. There is no fishing within 100 feet of signs indicating such closure at or near the mouths of tributaries to these rivers.

TROUT-LAKES & PONDS

– It’s big fish time, anglers can expect big trout to be caught through mid-June. Good reports from Squantz Pond, Highland Lake (4-5 colors, silver lure at 18-20 feet), East Twin Lake (rigger at 20 feet, copper/silver Mooselook, Kobra # 118; Mashapaug Lake, Crystal Lake (Kobra #2, black/white Huey, 7-8 colors), Lake Wononskopomuc Lake, Stillwater Lake, Beach Pond (#18 blue minx Huey, rigger at 20 feet), Long Pond (streamer on wire at 20 feet), West Hill Pond and Lake McDonough.

LARGEMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported as fair to good for largemouth. Places to try include Lake McDonough, Bantam Lake, Lake Saltonstall, Highland Lake, Candlewood Lake, Mudge Pond, Cedar Lake, Shetucket River, Lower/Upper Moodus Reservoir, Lake Lillinonah, Winchester Lake, Rainbow Reservoir, Pachaug Pond, Quaddick Reservoir, Wood Creek Pond, Mono Pond, Congamond Lakes, Burr Pond, Lake Wononskopomuc, Hopeville Pond, Silver Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Gardner Lake, Pickerel Lake, Mashapaug Lake, Billings Lake, Maltby Lakes, Stillwater Pond, Ball Pond, Red Cedar Lake and West Hill Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Amos Lake (fair fishing, 4.31 lb & 4.23 lb lunkers), Gardner Lake (fair action, hardly anything over 2 lbs, with a 2.21 lb lunker), Mansfield Hollow Reservoir (fair to good fishing, 4.44 lb lunker), Pickerel Lake (good fishing, 2.86 lb lunker, but fish barely average a pound apiece), Bantam Lake (slow for largemouth, “likely the high pressure system had them off bite”), Candlewood Lake (fair to good for largemouth, 5.26 lb, 4.76 lb, 4.75 lb & 4.65 lb lunkers), East Twin Lake (fair to good fishing, with a 6.75 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (fair to good fishing, 4.4 lb lunker), Winchester Lake (very good action, but on most sub-legal fish, tough finding “keepers”, 2.38 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS

are reported as tough to get in some areas, but they are there at Mashapaug Lake, Lake McDonough, Highland Lake, Bantam Lake and Candlewood Lake.

Tournament angler reports are from Gardner Lake (very few, 1.03 lb lunker), Bantam Lake (fair to good for smallies, fish in shallow, 3.5 lb lunker and the rest averaged 2 lbs apiece), Candlewood Lake (fair to good, 3.86 lb lunker), Colebrook River Lake (good action, with a 3.95 lb lunker but most fish were around a lb each), and Lake Lillinonah (a few in the bags, 1.8 lb lunker).

NORTHERN PIKE

fishing is reported to be good in Bantam Lake, Winchester Lake, fair at Pachaug Pond and tough at Quaddick Reservoir.

KOKANEE

are being caught at East Twin Lake (trolling red beads).

WALLEYE

are being reported from Batterson Park Pond, Squantz Pond and Lake Saltonstall.

PANFISH

fishing in the shallows has been very productive. Any local pond open to fishing near you will give you some action. Use worms, grubs and any type of inexpensive fishing pole or drop line and give these easy to catch fish a go. Kids love this non-stop action and it will keep them occupied for hours. Suggested locations include Candlewood Lake, Tyler Lake, Bishop Pond, Crescent Lake (Southington), Griggs Pond, Anderson Pond, Billings Lake, Halls Pond, Silver Lake (Berlin/Meriden), Quaddick Lake, Bantam Lake, Park Pond and Dog Pond.

CATFISH

action is very good in our Community Fishing Waters, Catfish Lakes, and the Connecticut River from Hartford to Haddam.

CARP

were reported from Mirror Lake, Batterson Park Pond, Squantz Pond, Lake Lillinonah and the Shetucket River.

CONNECTICUT RIVER

Flows are fishable, but way low for mid-June (4,600 cfs) and fairly clear. A few STRIPED BASS have been reported from the lower river, but it’s not easy. Trolling tube & worm and casting soft plastics will often work in stained water close to shore. CARP are coming to net in the Middletown – Haddam area. Pre-bait a site with corn/boilies and use a popup or helicopter rig will bring these power houses to you. WHITE PERCH are reported to be good in the lower river. SMALLMOUTH BASS are active in the Enfield and Middletown area, but you have to work to get them to bite.


MARINE REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the low to mid 60’s F.

STRIPED BASS

fishing is FANTASTIC. The big fish keep on rolling in so to speak. Its impressive how many large striped bass are being caught and released. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. There is plenty of bunker throughout LIS including the tidal rivers to hold fish. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

STRIPED BASS ANGLERS FISHING IN RHODE ISLAND WATERS are advised that the state of Rhode Island has adopted the following regulations pertaining to striped bass. These regulations apply to all Rhode Island state lands and waters including the waters around Block Island: “Any person recreationally harvesting a striped bass thirty-four (34) inches or larger shall at the time of harvest have the right pectoral fin removed at a point as close to the body of the fish as possible.”

SUMMER FLOUNDER

fishing is hit or miss for “keepers”. The eastern sound is getting more fluke as they move off Montauk Point. Mid to western LIS anglers are still reporting large fluke from 3 to 9 lbs. (Stratford/New Have/Woodmont area). Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Since squid are coming in large numbers, offering a live one on the bottom (10-40 feet) would be a good move for catching that big slab “doormat” fluke and becoming the “Duke of Fluke”. Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”- 4” Gulp Mullet in chartreuse, white or pink color. Fresh squid and or silversides (spearing) have also been producing. Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person.

STRIPED SEAROBIN

fishing continues to be steady for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. These beautiful and strange looking fish are very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With fish measuring over 23 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat. Please be careful when handling them…be mindful of their spines located on top of their head and gill cover.

WEAKFISH

fishing continue to impress. Good fishing in New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point and along Stratford shoals.

SCUP

fishing is very good in Long Island Sound. These scup are very large and delicious to eat! Seriously, try fishing for some “reef slammers” and enjoy some great fishing…there are lots of scup around for all. Porgies measuring 11-18 inches (“hubcap size”) have been caught! Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Rocky Neck State Park, Harkness Memorial State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLACK SEA BASS

fishing is getting hot and showing no signs of slowing down. Fishing over any deep water structure (gnarly bottom preferred) in 30 to 75 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass along with fluke and sea robins. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are 15 inch minimum length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet), on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

BLUEFISH

fishing has become more consistent with a mix bag of fish in the 3 to 9 lb range. The Race, Plum Gut, many of the major rocky reefs, rips, and shoal areas in LIS will harbor bluefish. Speed squidding diamond jigs, trolling parachute jigs or umbrella rigs, and using fresh bunker or hickory shad chunks on three-way bottom rigs have all been effective. Other bluefish spots include the Sluiceway, Gardiners Bay, Peconic Bays, and the north shore of Long Island along with the Stratford Shoal area. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best FISHING you will ever experience. Snappers (juvenile bluefish) have not arrived yet!

HICKORY SHAD

fishing remains fair to good in the Black Hall River, lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier and in Clinton Harbor. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass. Flood or the beginning of the Ebb tide is typically the best and lures of choice are a willow leaf (silver), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers”.

WHITE PERCH

fishing is good for these tasty panfish related to striped bass. Perch are found in most of the tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Productive spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, upper Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success. Another 14.5 inch 2.3 pound white perch was caught at Ferry Landing State Park in Old Lyme on a sandworm this past weekend under the railroad bridge.

BLUE CRAB

are becoming active in the tidal creeks and rivers. However, fishing remains slow for keepers. Expectations are for a good year following a relatively warm winter and good survival of juvenile crabs. There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (7 inches spike to spike). Remember…all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.


NOTABLE CATCHES
Species Length (in.) Weight (lbs) Name
Striped Searobin 18.5 C&R Jonathan Baldovin
Summer Flounder 26 6lb 12oz James Birtles
Tautog 30 C&R Dean Michael Vogel Sr.
Northern Kingfish 19.5 2lb 10oz Christopher Shea

Connecticut DEEP Fishing Report #38

INLAND REPORT

 TROUT- RIVERS & STREAMS  

– In general, conditions remain very good to excellent with clear water and stable flow (near normal levels). Nice catch of a 6+ pound rainbow out of the Naugatuck River! Across the board reports are good including all major rivers like the West branch Farmington River, Farmington River, Housatonic River, Blackberry River, Dickenson Creek, Eight Mile River, Hockanum River, Hop River, Jeremy River, Salmon River, Yantic River (TMA), Salmon River TMA, Crystal Lake Brook, Hammonasset River, Pequonnock River, Naugatuck River TMA, Pootatuck River, East Aspetuck River and Leadmine Brook.

Farmington River

Fishing has been very good and conditions for the weekend should be excellent. West Branch flows are very fishable levels (currently 275 cfs at Riverton, with the Still River adding another 65 cfs) and comfortable weather in the forecast.

Hatches/patterns

the main activity is happening late afternoon and early evening with several different insects including black or tan caddis (#18-#20) and a variety of mid-sized mayflies. Patterns to try include Vitreus [a.k.a. pale evening dun] #14-16, from 5:00 pm to dark, Tan Caddis (#14-16) good all day, Sulfurs, (Invaria #14- 16 hatches mid-day and Dorothea #16-18), Light Cahill (#12-18), March Brown nymphs (#10-14, during the day), Gray Fox (#10-14, afternoon), Blue Wing Olives (#18-24, mid-late afternoon), Midges (#20-32) and Pale Evening Duns (Epeorus vitreus #14-16, afternoon & early evenings). March Brown, Sulphur & Rusty Spinners are falling in the evenings.

Housatonic River

Fishing was good to very good last week and should be good again this weekend. Flows are steadily dropping from the quick burst of rain earlier this week. Currently, a bit turbid and running at 1,240 cfs at Falls village and 1,400 cfs at Gaylordsville (normal for this time of year). Morning water temperatures middle to upper 60’s°F (and should remain stable through the weekend).

Hatches/patterns

include Sulphurs (#14-18, evening), Blue Wing Olive (#16-18, cloudy days, early morning; spinner fall in evening), Cahill (#14, evenings), Adams (#12-16, evening), March Brown (#10-12, afternoon) and Gray Foxes (#14-16). Green caddis (#14-18, early morning & evening) are on the water. Go under the surface with wooly buggers or a variety of flashy streamers (to get the big ‘bows interested).

TROUT-LAKES & PONDS

Trout fishing remains good and plenty of bigger fish are still around (Highland Lake, Lake Wonosopomuc, and Crystal). Other places to try include Mashapaug Lake (Kobra- 112&118/flies at 3 colors/20 feet), West Hill Pond (20-30 feet down), Colebrook Reservoir (orange/copper Flash King at 26 feet), East Twin Lakes (beads at 3-4 colors over 35-40 feet of water), Squantz Pond, Crystal Lake (target 35-40 feet, 7 colors, Kobra-218), Black Pond (Woodstock 7 fish at 2 colors), Candlewood Lake, Stillwater Pond, Beach Pond (wooly bugger), Long Pond, Cedar Lake, Lake, and Black Pond (Meriden). A surprise 8-10 lb Rainbow Trout was recently caught-and-released at Mansfield Hollow Reservoir.

LARGEMOUTH BASS

fishing is reported as good and improving. Bass are in the shallows on their nests in many waters. Places to try include East Twin Lake, Shetucket River, Lake Lillinonah, Highland Lake, Cedar Lake, West Hill Pond, Lake Mcdonough, Congamond Lakes, Bantam Lake, Wyassup Lake, Beseck Lake (refilled and producing some fish), Pickerel Lake, Wononskopomuc Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Silver Lake (Meriden), Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Candlewood Lake, Lake Saltonstall, Mudge Pond, Lake Waramaug, Batterson Park Pond, Burr Pond, Gardner Lake, Moodus Reservoir, Bishop Pond, Pachaug Pond, Billings Lake, Maltby Lakes, Stillwater Pond, Ball Pond, Red Cedar Lake and Winchester Lake.

Tournament angler reports are from Coventry Lake (fair fishing, with a 6.39 lb lunker), Mansfield Hollow Reservoir (steady action, but no really big fish, 2.83 & 2.73 lb lunkers), Pachaug Pond (good action, 4.69 lb lunker), Quaddick Lake (good action, with a 5.23 lb lunker), Rogers Lake (fair to good fishing, 3.44 lb lunker), Bantam Lake (fair to good fishing, 5.2 & 4.75 lb lunkers), .Candlewood Lake (fair for largemouth, 4.13 lb, 4.12 lb, & 4.1 lb lunkers), East Twin Lake (fair to good, 4.12 lb lunker), Highland Lake (good for largemouth, 4.12 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (fair action, 3.69 lb lunker), and Lake Zoar (fair action, 4.96 lb lunker).

SMALLMOUTH BASS

are reported at Colebrook River Lake, Candlewood Lake, Highland Lake, Bantam Lake and Squantz Pond.

Tournament angler reports are from Coventry Lake (a few in the bags, 2.25 lb lunker), Pachaug Pond (a few caught), Bantam Lake (not many but a 3.4 lb lunker), Candlewood Lake (fair to good fishing, 3.75 lb lunker), Highland Lake (tough finding smallies, 3.02 lb lunker), Lake Lillinonah (fair to good fishing), and Lake Zoar (fair for smallies, 3.0 lb lunker).

NORTHERN PIKE

fishing is reported to be very good in Lake Lillinonah and good in Bantam Lake and Winchester Lake.

WALLEYE

a couple of nice fish from Mashapaug Lake (6 and 8 pounds) and some scattered action at Lake Saltonstall, Squantz Pond and Batterson Park Pond.

CALICO BASS AND SUNFISH

Post-spawn mortality has slowed a bit from last week but some reports continue to trickle in. Some level of mortality is expected, as the spawning is stressful time, leaving the fish vulnerable to infection and less ability to handle rising water temperatures. Please see our Post-Spawn fact sheet on our web site. Despite the natural mortality, fishing remains good as fish are “getting back to normal” following the spawn.

CATFISH

consistent action in the evening the Connecticut River (Hartford to Haddam) and at Community Fishing Waters including; Freshwater Lake, Lake Wintergreen, Pickett’s Pond, Mohegan Park Pond, Keeney Park Pond, and Center Springs Pond. Catfish Management lakes like Lower Bolton Lake, Silver Lake, and the Maltby Lakes are also yielding decent and consistent catches. Try live shiners, chunk bait, or night crawlers.

CONNECTICUT RIVER

Flows remain about half the normal level for this time of year, currently at 7,700 cfs and water temperature is cool for June at 72°F. Catches of STRIPED BASS at the river mouth continued to be spotty but good. Finding a school of bunker will help you get onto the jumbo bass. CARP continue to provide steady action as this fishery never disappoints. Will this be the year for the new state record fish? The Hartford PowerPlant, Middletown’s Harbor Park, and the mouth of the Mattebesset River are holding some mid-size Carp. Pre-baiting your selected site is a great way to increase catches. Boilies, pack, popup rigs and barbless hooks are working and allowing anglers to release their catch to get bigger. SMALLMOUTH BASS fishing continues to improve on a variety of surface and plastics. Try jigging ‘creature baits’ in this low clear water. Tournament anglers found some smallmouth (including a 2.61 lb lunker). LARGEMOUTH BASS fishing was fair (2.8 lb tournament lunker).


MARINE REPORT

Surface water temperatures in Long Island Sound (LIS) are in the 60’s F.

STRIPED BASS

fishing overall is very good. WOW! What a week. I can’t remember when we have seen so many big cow bass (45 – 61 inches). Jolyn Wiggins tops the charts with a 60 inch beauty of a striper from the central sound. She is to be congratulating for letting that huge striped bass go…thank you for practicing catch & release. Dawn and dusk is prime time for large stripers on the reefs, rip areas and lower coastal tidal rivers. Live lining eels, bunker or hickory shad has been the ticket. There is plenty of bunker throughout LIS including the tidal rivers to hold fish. Striper areas include the Watch Hill reefs, lower Thames River, the Race, Plum Gut, Pigeon Rip, outer Bartlett Reef, Black Point, Hatchett Reef, lower Connecticut River (Great Island), Long Sand Shoal, Cornfield Point, Southwest Reef (outer), Westbrook, Sixmile Reef, Falkner Island area, the reefs off Branford, New Haven Harbor (including Sandy Point), Charles Island area, Housatonic River, buoys 18 and 20 off Stratford Point, Stratford Shoal/Middle Ground, Bridgeport Harbor, Penfield Reef, around the Norwalk Islands, and Cable and Anchor Reef.

SUMMER FLOUNDER

fishing is improving quickly as the weather warms. The eastern sound is starting to get very good as many summer flounder move off Montauk Point. Mid to western LIS anglers are reporting fluke from 3 to 11 lbs. (Stratford area). Fluke spots include south shore of Fishers Island (Isabella Beach, Wilderness Point), Watch Hill to Napatree Point, off the Stonington breakwater, mouth of the Mystic River to Groton Long Point, Thames River channel, Gardiners Bay over to Greenport, NY, Twotree Channel, Black Point/Niantic Bay, Long Sand Shoal, Westbrook-Clinton area, Falkner Island area, New Haven Harbor to West Haven, off the mouth of the Housatonic River, Norwalk Islands, and across over to Port Jefferson, NY. Since squid are coming in large numbers, offering a live one on the bottom (10-40 feet) would be a good move for catching that big slab “doormat” fluke and becoming the “Duke of Fluke”. Try drifting with a white or pink Bucktail Jig and attach a Berkely 3”- 4” Gulp Mullet in chartreuse, white or pink color. Fresh squid and or silversides (spearing) have also been producing. Minimum size is 18 inches and the daily creel limit is 5 fish per person.

STRIPED SEAROBIN

fishing continues to be steady for this “hardhead fish with spines and large pectoral fins”. Also, called “Poor-Man’s Lobster”, these fish are very common especially when bottom fishing at many of Connecticut’s shore fishing sites. With fish measuring over 22 inches and “barking up a storm” (grunting noise they make when handling them). They love sandworms, squid and any live or dead bait. They are also very good to eat.

WEAKFISH

fishing is good in New Haven Harbor by the breakwaters over to Woodmont/Milford Point.

SCUP

fishing is very good around Gardiners Bay. Also, improving throught Long Island Sound. My recommendation is to hook up with a Party or Charter Boat and enjoy some of the best scup fishing you will ever experience. These scup are very large and delicious to eat! Seriously, try fishing on a party boat and enjoy some great fishing…there are lots of scup around for all. Porgies measuring 11-18 inches (“hubcap size”) have been caught! Porgy fishing has also been reported at these shore fishing locations: Rocky Neck State Park, Meigs Point Hammonassett State Park and Fort Trumbull State Park. Locate your favorite Enhanced Shore Fishing Opportunities for these excellent eating “Reef Slammers”. These “panfish of the sea” are easily caught on sandworms/cut squid or any other small piece of bait. Contact your local bait and tackleshop for updated fishing information.

BLACK SEA BASS

fishing is getting hot. A 25.25 inch, six pound beauty was caught on the Lucky lady this past week. The early season hot spot is Falkner Island, central sound, six mile reef and from New Haven to Darien. Fishing over any deep water structure (gnarly bottom preferred) in 60 to 100 ft around slack tide will produce some trophy-sized “humpbacks”. Fish shallower and you will catch plenty of keeper-sized sea bass along with fluke and sea robins. It’s important to continue to move from structure to structure to find these beautiful and awesome eating fish. Remember, CT black sea bass regulations are as follows…15 inch min. length, 5 fish daily limit from May 1st to December 31st. Berkely Gulp (swimming mullet) on a jig along with squid with a spinner works great for these “Bucketmouths”.

BLUEFISH

fishing is finally improving. Bluefish spots include the Race, Plum Gut, Sluiceway, Gardiners Bay, Peconic Bays, and the north shore of Long Island. Fresh bunker chunks on three way rigs or speed squidding diamond jigs work well.

HICKORY SHAD

fishing is good in the lower Connecticut River by the DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier, Hammonassett and other shoreline locations. Also, try the Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, Baldwin Bridge State Boat Launch, Clinton Harbor, lower Housatonic River and Fort Trumbull. Connecticut Tarpon (Hickory shad) can be found mixed in with schoolie striped bass. Flood or Ebb tide is typically the best and lures of choice are a willow leaf (gold & silver), kastmaster (single hook), small plastic jigs (white or chartreuse), and or shad darts in various colors. You will be impressed with these “high flyers”.

WHITE PERCH

fishing is very good for these tasty panfish in most of the tidal rivers and coves along the Connecticut shoreline. Perch spots include the Pawcatuck River, Mystic River, Thames River, upper Niantic River, lower Connecticut River (DEEP Marine Headquarters fishing pier), Black Hall River, Lieutenant River, North/South Cove and Hamburg Cove. Grass Shrimp and a small piece of sandworm fished on the bottom are the keys to success.

BLUE CRAB

fishing remains slow for keepers. I expect a good year following a relatively warm winter and good survival of juvenile crabs. There are some large “jimmies” (male crabs) being captured (7 inches spike to spike). Remember…all egg bearing females must be released with unavoidable harm. Minimum carapace length is 5 inches for a hard shell crab. Please contact your local bait and tackle shop for most updated information (local hot spots), legal crab traps and bait to use for your fun-filled crabbing. Legal gear types include: scoop (dip) net, hand line, star crab trap, circular (topless) trap not exceeding 26 inches in diameter. Maryland Style Crab traps are prohibited. Chicken with the skin on it (along with a long handle net) is the preferred method to capture these tasty crabs.


NOTABLE CATCHES
Species Length (in.) Weight (lbs) Name
Clearnose Skate 51.5 17 Jennifer Zuppe
Striped Bass (C&R) 61 54 Jolyn Wiggins
Striped Bass (C&R) 47.5 39 Malcolm Hafford
Monkfish (Goosefish) 40 42 Craig Weagle
Striped Searobin 22.75 3.6 Albert Zuppe
Black Sea Bass 23 7.8 Melissa Burwell
Hogchoker 10.25 9 oz Albert Zuppe
Northern Kingfish 19.5 2lb 9oz Christopher Shea
  • Previous Image
    Next Image

    info heading

    info content